Making of the “Jez” and “Ginge” kitty cats 3D Acrylic Paintings by artist Purple Faye

Here’s how I made the “Jez” and “Ginge” kitty cats 3D Acrylic Paintings. They are what I made as part of my demonstration at Holmfirth Art Week this year (which you can read more about here.)

The inspiration for them was the cute cats in the app game Neko Atsume (Cat Collector). I really liked how their simple design still looked cute. It reminded me of some of my earlier work where I gave the cats and dogs big cartoon eyes and I decideed that it was something that I wanted to return to.

Originally I was going to do a few in different poses, I am still going to do some more, but for the purpose of the demonstration I felt that I could show the process more effectively by having them in the same pose but with more subtle differences in size, texture and colour.

Last year when I did the demonstration at Holmfirth Art Week I showed the first few stages up to putting the modroc on but I didn’t do any painting, so this year I wanted to prepare some that were already at the painting stage so I would be able to demonstrate that part too.

My plan was to have one at each stage so that when people visited at different times of the day they would still be able to see the full process.

I started by drawing the basic outline of a cute cat on cardboard and cut it out, I then used this as a template to make the rest by drawing round it onto more pices of cardboard.

When it came to cutting these new cats out I’d change the shape slightly so each one would be slightly different then made them 3D in the same way by using more cardboard.

When I put the modroc on I gave each one a different texture using techniques such as scrunching, scoring and smoothing so that I could show what the modroc could do. I then left these to dry and sanded them before taking them to the demonstration.

If you would like to make one for yourself you can do so in a workshop with me at my studio in Pontefract, WF8 1PE (above Wetherspoons)

Contact info@purplefaye.co.uk

You can buy a kit from me directly, The Picture Box Gallery in Wakefield or from my shops on etsy and folksy.

etsy.com/uk/shop/PurpleFayeShop

folksy.com/shops/PurpleFaye

You can see videos of this on my youtube channel too youtube.com/purplefayecouk

I’m hoping to make some more 3D Acrylic Paintings of cute kitty cats with love heart noses soon.

What cat poses and colours should I do? Would you like to see more dogs and other animals done like this too?

Let me know in the comments below.

Thanks

Take care,

Till next time.

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

How I made the “Spitfire MK VB” 3D Acrylic Painting

Here’s how I made the “Spitfire MK VB” 3D Acrylic Painting…..

A bit about the Spitfire:

“The Supermarine Spitfire is a British single-seat fighter aircraft that was used by the Royal Air Force and many other Allied countries before, during and after the Second World War. The Spitfire was built in many variants, using several wing configurations, and was produced in greater numbers than any other British aircraft. It was also the only British fighter to be in continuous production throughout the war. The Spitfire continues to be popular among enthusiasts, with approximately 53 Spitfires being airworthy, while many more are static exhibits in aviation museums throughout the world.

The Spitfire was designed as a short-range, high-performance interceptor aircraft by R. J. Mitchell, chief designer at Supermarine Aviation Works, which operated as a subsidiary of Vickers-Armstrong from 1928. In accordance with its role as an interceptor, Mitchell supported the development of the Spitfire’s distinctive elliptical wing (designed by B. Shenstone) to have the thinnest possible cross-section; this enabled the Spitfire to have a higher top speed than several contemporary fighters, including the Hawker Hurricane. Mitchell continued to refine the design until his death in 1937, whereupon his colleague Joseph Smith took over as chief designer, overseeing the development of the Spitfire through its multitude of variants.

During the Battle of Britain, from July to October 1940, the Spitfire was perceived by the public to be the RAF fighter, though the more numerous Hawker Hurricane shouldered a greater proportion of the burden against the Nazi German air force, the Luftwaffe. Spitfire units, however, had a lower attrition rate and a higher victory-to-loss ratio than those flying Hurricanes because of its higher performance. Spitfires in general were tasked with engaging the Luftwaffe fighters (mainly Messerschmitt Bf 109E series aircraft which were a close match for the Spitfire) during the Battle.

After the Battle of Britain, the Spitfire superseded the Hurricane to become the backbone of RAF Fighter Command, and saw action in the European, Mediterranean, Pacific and the South-East Asian theatres. Much loved by its pilots, the Spitfire served in several roles, including interceptor, photo-reconnaissance, fighter-bomber and trainer, and it continued to serve in these roles until the 1950s. The Seafire was a carrier-based adaptation of the Spitfire which served in the Fleet Air Arm from 1942 through to the mid-1950s. Although the original airframe was designed to be powered by a Rolls-Royce Merlin engine producing 1,030 hp (768 kW), it was strong enough and adaptable enough to use increasingly powerful Merlins and, in later marks, Rolls-Royce Griffon engines producing up to 2,340 hp (1,745 kW); as a consequence of this the Spitfire’s performance and capabilities improved over the course of its life.” taken from en.wikipedia.org

“The VB became the main production version of the Mark Vs. Along with the new Merlin 45 series the B wing was fitted as standard. As production progressed changes were incorporated, some of which became standard on all later Spitfires. Production started with several Mk IBs which were converted to Mk VBs by Supermarine. Starting in early 1941 the round section exhaust stacks were changed to a “fishtail” type, marginally increasing exhaust thrust. Some late production VBs and VCs were fitted with six shorter exhaust stacks per side, similar to those of Spitfire IXs and Seafire IIIs; this was originally stipulated as applying specifically to VB(trop)s.[82] After some initial problems with the original Mk I size oil coolers, a bigger oil cooler was fitted under the port wing; this could be recognised by a deeper housing with a circular entry. From mid-1941 alloy covered ailerons became a universal fitting.” taken from en.wikipedia.org

 

If you have any further questions about how I made it then please feel free to ask or just let me know what you think about it,

comment below or email info@purplefaye.co.uk

 

Till next time,

Take care

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

Making of the “Baby African Elephant” 3D Acrylic Painting

I started to make the”Baby African Elephant” 3D Acrylic Painting in June/July to take to Holmfirth Art Week as part of the demonstration I was doing of how I make my work. I wanted to take some work in progress pieces to help show the process I use to make my work. Since then I’ve been using it to help explain my technique to visitors to my studio in Pontefract but I wanted to get it finished finally. Here’s how I did it.

Watch the video on youtube

https://youtu.be/IG04AkxyPDM

I love to get your feedback so please leave a comment or get in touch info@purplefaye.co.uk

Till next time

Take Care

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

Making of the “All Saints Church 2” in Pontefract 3D Acrylic Painting by Purple Faye

The making of my most recent 3D Acrylic Painting of the All Saints Church in Pontefract, West Yorkshire.

A little history about the All Saints Church –

There has been a church on the site or close by since Anglo Saxon times, it even featured in the Domesday Book survey in the year 1086. The present church was built around the 1300s, but only a few parts of that church now remain. In 1536 when Henry the 8th announced dissolution it sparked an uprising known as the Pilgrimage of Grace, many supporters went to Pontefract to establish themselves in the nearby castle. The then Archbishop of York was preaching in the church at Pontefract and asked for moderation, this had a reverse effect on the congregation and they dragged him from the pulpit and off to the castle. When the civil war took place the church was constantly changing from one side to the other and at one time was reported to have been hit over 60 times by cannon balls. In fact during recent renovations one was found still embedded in one of the walls.

This is the first 3D Acrylic Painting I’ve made in my Pontefract studio as part of my Ponte Project

The next one will be Pontefract Castle so look out for the work in progress of that on Instagram/Facebook/Twitter

(@purplefayeuk/purplefaye.co.uk)

Don’t worry if you miss it as I’ll be showing the complete process in a blog post like this too.

Till next time

Take care

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

Dexter and Damien: the first 3D Acrylic Paintings made in my Ponte studio

Now I’ve properly moved into my new studio in Pontefract, and had my open evening to give people the chance to visit/see my tactile, sculptural and unique 3D Acrylic Paintings, it’s time to get to work making more to show you.

Since part of the reason for needing the studio space was to give myself some room to work away from my ever so cute but not so helpful cats it made sense to me that the first pieces I made there was of them.

Here’s how I made them from cardboard and modroc….

 

In case you were wondering why there’s only 2 paintings when I have 3 cats Naughty Norman fluffycat had his picture done while I was still in the pop up shop in Castleford a year or so ago. I’ve been meaning to get round to making Dexter and Damien theirs and now seemed like the perfect opportunity.

If you’d like a 3D Acrylic Painting making of your cat let me know, info@purplefaye.co.uk

Till next time
Take care

Purple Faye x
purplefaye.co.uk

Greetings cards idea…..”Robin” 3D Acrylic Painting from start to finish

I’ve been thinking for a while about doing greetings cards of my 3D Acrylic Paintings. They’d be a good entry level way for people to own a piece of my work. The problem I’ve had with it though is that my work is about being 3D (- Tactile – Sculptural – Unique -) which a 2D card isn’t.

I’ve been trying to get my head around that for a while and now I’m at the point of thinking that people like my paintings for the images themselves with the 3D effect being an extra element to it. That being the case a greetings card can still be appreciated for the image even if it doesn’t have the 3D element to it.

So which to choose to make a greetings card of?

Christmas cards seem like an obvious place to start and I know that they don’t necessarily have to be “Christmasy” but I’d made this “Robin” (below) a couple of years ago and I thought it would look nice as a Christmas card. But then me being me I wanted to have another go, just in case I liked the new one better.

robin-old

So here is the new “Robin” 3D Acrylic Painting from start to finish…. (hover over the pictures to read more about it)

Now you’ve seen them both which one do you like best the new or the old one?

Let me know in the comments or drop me an email to info@purplefaye.co.uk

Till next time

Take care

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

Holmfirth Art Week – Sun 5th – Sat 11th July 2015

This was my first year submitting to be part of Holmfirth Art Week, I’d been encouraged to give it a try while I was at the Artworld 2 Gallery in Wakefield (which unfortunately closed down at Christmas) and I was pleasantly surprised to be successful and asked to exhibit two of my 3D Acrylic Paintings.

I was finding it difficult to choose which two I’d take but thanks to my newsletter subscribers and social media followers/likers “Lancaster Bomber” and “Mummy and Baby African Elephants”‘ were picked.

Then as an additional bonus a few weeks before it was due to take place I was given the opportunity to go along on one of the days with more of my work to do a demonstration showing how I make my 3D Acrylic Paintings. These would also be available for sale so I wanted to make the most of this additional opportunity but I didn’t know how much room I was going to have to display them.

Fortunately when I was there for taking in day, which was the week before the Art Week started, I was able to see where the demonstrating area was going to be and the size of the board I’d be given to use. So that made it easier for me to try to figure out what to take.

I wanted to take a range of different sizes/prices and subject matter to give people an overview of what I can do and hopefully entice them to find out more. I planned on using the larger ones on the board and the smaller ones on the table near to where I’d be demonstrating how to make them. I’d also take along some of the “Make Your Own” starter kits that I’ve been developing for those that are inspired to try it for themselves.

Whenever I’ve done arts and crafts fairs in the past I’ve always struggled with wanting to take everything I’ve got so there’s more chance of someone seeing one that they like enough to buy. Obviously this isn’t very practical or realistic to do but I still can’t help worrying that I’ve picked the wrong ones to take and that if I’d only taken such and such instead they would have sold. This feeling is especially heightened when I’ve not been selling anything. So I was actually quite impressed with myself for only taking a relatively small amount (for me).

IMG_2615
Start of the demonstration of my 3D Acrylic Paintings at Holmfirth Art Week

Along with the finished 3D Acrylic Paintings I wanted to take some that were at different stages of the process so I could show people more easily how they were made. I took some small ones, of a car, boat and plane, that I’d made a while ago for the same purpose of showing people the process when I was at the pop up shop/gallery/studio in Castleford. But I also wanted to take some larger ones to put on the board for people to see from more of a distance too. I decided that I’d make a baby elephant and leave it at the modroc stage so then I could show how the texture is added by the modroc and that I’d make a Spitfire and leave it at the cardboard stage to show how the different layers go together to make it 3D. (You can see them in the picture above).

I picked a baby elephant and a Spitfire because of having “Lancaster Bomber” and “Mummy and Baby African Elephants” in the exhibition. I thought it might help explain the process better if they’d seen the finished work along with work in progress of similar ones of the same subject matters (it made sense in my head anyway even if I’m not explaining it very well here)

For the demonstration itself I decided that I’d just make a little one from scratch so then it wouldn’t take so long with waiting for things to dry. I picked a highland cow because they’re good for showing how to get texture with the modroc and they’re not too fiddly either.

I had planned on completing it  but in the end I only got to the modroc stage. It wasn’t quite how I thought it was going to be in terms of it being a demonstration so there weren’t many people who stuck around to watch what I was doing for long. This meant that I ended up waiting for some people to come before doing a bit to show them, then when they went I stopped and waited for more people to come before doing a bit more. So I didnt get to the painting bit.

Even though it wasn’t quite what I was expecting it to be I’m still glad that I did it and was even talking to the organiser about doing it again next year (so fingers crossed for that).

Unfortunatley I didn’t sell anything while I was there doing the demonstration and when I went on collection day I’d not sold either of the paintings in the exhibition either. I can’t help being disappointed about it but I’m going to keep trying though.

Any comments or questions are more than welcome so feel free to tell me in whatever way is best for you, email info@purplefaye.co.uk or comment on here or message me on social media, whatever works for you 🙂

Till next time

Take care

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk