Artist Purple Faye Art Adventure: Light Night Leeds Friday 11th October 2019

Last Friday, 11th October 2019, we went to see Light Night Leeds again. The first time I went was in 2016, which was the first year it was held on a Friday as well as Thursday (it had only been on a thursday night before then starting in 2005). You can read the blog post I wrote about that one here.

That first year I went on my own and enjoyed it so much that the next year my boyfriend wanted to come too, which you can read about here, and last year we had a family outing with my sister and nephew plus my mum and boyfriend all joining me, you can read about that one here.

A little more about Light Night Leeds 2019 taken from the website https://whatson.leeds.gov.uk/lightnight/Home

Experience Art in the Dark!

 

Light Night Leeds is the UK’s largest annual arts and light festival.

Over two incredible nights in October some of Leeds’ most recognisable indoor and outdoor spaces are transformed by spectacular artworks and captivating performances by local, national and international artists. Light Night invites people to see the city in a new light and discover over 60 free arts events across the city centre. From large-scale light projections and interactive installations, to music, dance and street performances, there is always something for everyone!

In 2019 Light Night celebrated the theme of ‘Mind, Body and Spirit’ – launching with a vibrant illuminated parade all about our dreams and imagination.

This year my mum wasn’t able to make it but my sister, nephew and boyfriend did, We parked at The Tetley (as they had reduced their parking to only £2 from 5pm onwards specially for Light Night Leeds) and we started by walking round to the docks to see ‘Voyage’ by artists Aether & Hemera which featured 100 illuminated ‘origami’ boats and ‘Shape of Light’ by Alex Webb which explored geometric arrangements of light and shadow set against an urban backdrop of granite. glass and water.

Next we popped into Leeds Minister for ‘Light Up Leeds Minister’ before making our way to the Corn Exchange where ‘Conductor” by Interplay Theatre was. When we got there the queues were quite long so even though there were sessions running every 10 minutes or so we decided not to wait and made our way to Granary Wharf instead.

At Granary Wharf was ‘Halo’ by artist Micheal Davis individual but digitally interlinked columns of ever evolving patterns of light and sound and ‘Ghost Caribou’ by Thingumajig Theatre where giant illuminated creatures, part caribou, part spirit roam a mystical world after dark accompanied by a wild herdsman. With music, song and shadow puppetsthey tell stories of lost homes, impossible migrations and seeds of hope before continuing the journey into their hautingley beautiful dream-world of the night.

Next we headed up to The Queens Hotel to see ‘The Vision’ by Ocubo.

Throughout the show, the imaginations of two characters were represented by an immersive experience into their minds. Taking the audience into a dream of endless exuberant mind landscapes through the eyes of those characters dreams.

It was while we were here that it started to rain, thankfully it didn’t last long though and by the time we got to Millennium Square to see ‘Angels of Freedom’ by OGE Group, Merav Eitan & Gaston Zahr it had almost stopped.

We had a quick look at ‘With Love’ by artist Franck Pelletier at the Town Hall which was a bright red heart that measured you and your partners Beats per Minute then played a clip from a love song based on that combined value, and then headed up to Leeds Civic Hall to see ‘Telekinetic Rumours’ by artist Pani Pawlosky. Fusing imagery, music and sound to create an immersive dreamlike story, taking us on a surrealist journey exploring the complexity of energy flow between mind, body and soul.

 

Next we went to Queen Square to see ‘Brothers and Sisters’ by artist Ron Haselden. Children from two Leeds primary schools, Richmond Hill Academy and Co-op Academy Oakwood, took part in special workshops to draw a picture of their sibling or friend and 10 were selected to be transformed into a large scale garland of LED lights.

From there we started walking back down to The Tetley, passing by Merrion gardens to see ‘Les Footballeurs’ by French artist Remi Brun. Two footballers, an attacker striking the ball and a goalkeeper diving to make a save, cleverly transmitted in a sequence of LED lights. and ‘Lightbattle X’ by VENIVIDIMULTIPLEX from the Netherlands on Briggate. Two crossed arches made of thousands of LED lights, each with a bike at it’s base which when pedalled hard pushes the beam of light to the middle as fast as possible to beat the other opponents.

Finally with only 10 minutes left of the event we made it back to The Tetley to see ‘Pleasance’ by NOVAK. This was our favourite thing of the evening and featured a 35 metre ground projection which was inspired by the forthcoming development, Aire Park, which is soon to transform the former Brewery Site.

We all enjoyed the evening, there is so much to see that if you can go for both days then you’ll have a better chance to see everything. It was also useful to have the app to show where things were as we were walking around and to have a bit of a plan of what things we wanted to get round to seeing.

I hope you’ve enjoyed this blog post as a way of seeing what you missed and maybe give you a taste of what it was like. I’m already looking forward to seeing that they come up with for next year!

 

Till next time.

Take care.

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

Pontefract artist Purple Faye solo exhibition at the Theatre Royal Wakefield 22nd August – 12th September 2017

The Theatre Royal Wakefield will be showing an exhibition of 3D acrylic paintings made by the Pontefract based artist Purple Faye.

Purple Faye transforms ordinary cardboard boxes and modroc, plaster of Paris in bandages, into beautiful 3D acrylic paintings that are tactile, sculptural and unique.

This solo exhibition shows a variety of subject matter showcasing the technique. Including planes, trains, buildings, dogs, flowers and elephants. The artworks are for sale, contact the artist directly to do so, info@purplefaye.co.uk.

A selection of cards/prints and kits to try the technique to make a 3D picture for yourself are available to buy directly from the theatre.

“The exhibition is looking great. I think the work looks great in the space” Exhibition organiser Emily England.

The exhibition will run from August 22nd until September 12th 2017 in the café area on the corner of the building. It will be open subject to show opening times. Check with the box office or theatreroyalwakefield.co.uk for more details.

Box Office: 01924 211 311

Theatre Royal Wakefield

Drury Lane

Wakefield

West Yorkshire

WF1 2TE

 

Find out more about the artist on purplefaye.co.uk

 

 

Pontefract artist Purple Faye preparing for Holmfirth Artweek: 2nd – 8th July 2017

Holmfirth Artweek is one of the UK’s largest open art exhibitions and is a fundraising event for Macmillan Cancer Support, 20% of all sales goes towards the charity.

This year is my 3rd year taking part, you can read about my first year here and second year here.

This year the two 3D acrylic paintings I’ve chosen to submit are my ‘Medium Daffodil’ and ‘Tulips’.

Additionally this year I’m going to have some things in the marketplace too, my 3D print greetings cards and some framed versions.

Taking in day was last Sunday, 25th June, so I needed to get everything ready by labelling it up with all the necessary information that they needed. They provide guidelines that let you know exactly what they want to help make this easy to do.

The main event takes place at Holmfirth Civic Hall, the market is on the second floor and the demonstrations are on the stage in the main room on the first floor. This is where I will be on Thursday and Friday showing how I make my 3D acrylic paintings, I’ll also have more of my work with me for sale plus kits so you can try my 3D technique for yourself.

This year as well as having a new online application process there is also a catalogue featuring infomation about all the artists and work in the exhibition, I’m on page 60, there is also information about the fringe events taking place in Holmfirth during artweek too.

DATES FOR ARTWEEK 2017

Sun 2nd July: 10.00am – 5.00pm

Mon 3rd – Fri 7th July: 10.00am – 9.00pm

Sat 8th July: 10.00am – 5.00pm*

* The market closes at 16.00 on Saturday 8th

Where is it?

The main exhibition takes place at Holmfirth Civic Hall, with additional Fringe venues dotted around the Holmfirth Area. There is plenty of parking in the Co-op car park directly across the road from the hall.

Holmfirth Civic Hall,
Huddersfield Road, Holmfirth, HD9 3AS

holmfirthartweek.org.uk

 

I look forward to seeing you on Thursday and Friday 10am-9pm

Till then,

Take care.

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

 

 

Purple Faye Art Adventure: The Hepworth Wakefield Spring Market 2017

Last Saturday (8th April) I went to the Spring Market at The Hepworth Wakefield.

Held in The Calder, this was the first year of it taking place as part of their Easter program of events. “featuring specially selected food produce, textiles, homewares, ceramics, cosmetics, jewellery, stationery and more, sourced and produced by regionally-based artists, makers, designers and bakers.”

The street market was also there serving a range of cuisines, cakes, coffee and local ales along with live music from local musicians.

As it was a lovely sunny day a lot of people were enjoying the street market sat on the grass.

I thought it was a good idea for The Hepworth to hold a Spring Market in The Calder but I think they could have done with more stalls or to let the ones that were there spread out a bit. When I walked in it only seemed to be half full with all the stalls squished together at one end, which was a bit disappointing. The stalls that were there had some lovely things though, and it was nice to see Ali Appleby (studio holder at The Art House) for a quick catchup and a look at her latest beautiful printed wares. I even treated my boyfriend to some award winning, it won the bronze award in the Louisiana ultra hot category in 2015, really hot sauce from The Unusual Chutney Company which he said was nice but not as hot as he thought it was going to be. (He was at work when I went so wasn’t able to come along with me)

“Stall holders include:

Ali Appleby
A H Jewellery
BAKESBOX
Block Culture
Brockleby’s Pies
Arthur Dove Infusions
Dandelion Cocoa
Factory Floor Jewels

Fruity Tipples
Geo Fleur
Katey and Josephine
LIFE IS better in COLOUR
Little Badger Cider Co
Little Shop of Lathers
Lovely Cosmetics
Mary’s House Designs

Miriam Griffiths Knitwear
Mister Charlesworth
North Doodle Co
Rach Red Designs
Red Paper House 
Rich and Fancy Cupcakes
Riddles
Seasonal Larder
Slow Rise Bagels
Snug Aromatics
Sophie Eveleigh Ceramics
West Plum Studio
Thrifty Maker
Tuck X Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun
The Unusual Chutney Co
What Kate Loves
Winning Works

Street Food Market:

Dim Sum Su, Golden Balls, Hull Pie Company and Noisette Bakehouse”

Taken from http://www.hepworthwakefield.org/whatson/spring-market/

 

I look forward to seeing what other fairs/markets/events The Hepworth puts on in The Calder this year, I may even apply to take part in some too.

 

Till next time

Take care

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

Purple Faye’s Pontefract Yorkshire Day judging adventure

Last Monday, 1st August 2016, was Yorkshire Day and Pontefract, West Yorskhire, had a number of events on to celebrate.

Some of the local businesses decorated their window displays with a Yorkshire theme and the Chair of the Pontefract Civic Society, Paul Cartwright, very kindly invited me along to help pick which was the best.

Along with Councillor David Jones we spent about an hour or so looking at them all, just about managing to avoid the rain that descended, and decided on a winner and a runner up.

Here are some pictures that Paul and David took of the displays and the winner/runner up getting their certificates.

 

Here’s what Paul had to say on the Pontefract Civic Society facebook page

“The civic society announced in May that after the success of the Christmas shop window displays, we’d give it a go again in an effort to promote the town and business. The interest was a little lower than Christmas, so today we had 8 windows to judge, and our Chair, Paul Cartwright was joined by Cllr David Jones Deputy Regen/Business Portfolio, and Purple Faye, a local artist with a studio on Finkle Street. We had a good hour wandering around the town, dodging the shower stopping off at Brosgill Opticians, Airedale Computers, Pontefract Library, Belles (now Olives), Pomfret Gallery, Wilson’s Pies, Top Mark Suit Hire, and finally Southgate Kitchen & Bathroom Studio with Hark Interiors

All registered entrants are thanked for their efforts, with the real creativity being displayed at Pomfret Gallery with a framed castle of Pontefract Cakes, and we then had a similar theme of the very best of Yorkshire at Belles and Southgate Kitchen & Bathroom Studio with Hark Interiors. So, the judges decision then became final!

We were pleased to award a Runner Up Certificate and some small gifts to Helen, the new owner at Belles (or Olives as it will soon be rebranded. The judges felt that the window looked great with Yorkshire Tea and other food produce, together with gardening themes, Yorkshire bunting, and Yorkshire Life Magazine as part of the display.

Our winning shop window for today was awarded to Southgate Kitchen & Bathroom Studio with Hark Interiors, where Karen Morley was thrilled to receive her certificate and goodies from Pontefract Civic Society The judges noted a plethora of Yorkshire themes from a tweed jacket, to dogs, tea, liquorice all sorts, Yorkshire bunting, and it was then the sporting collection which swung the judges, through the inclusion of rugby and cricket.

Karen would also like to thank Tordoff’s and Signature for providing some of the display material.

Thanks also to David Jones Photography”

Here’s a video of the day by BBC Radio Leeds:

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FBBCRadioLeeds%2Fvideos%2F10153285518627824%2F&show_text=0&width=560

 

I was really flattered to be asked to help out, walking around seeing all the lovely displays that people had taken the time to make and talking to Paul and David about matters to do with Pontefract was an enjoyable experience and made me feel more a part of the town and community.

I look forward to seeing the festive displays at Christmas.

 

Till next time.

Take care,

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

How I made the Pontefract “Buttercross and St Giles Church” 3D Acrylic Painting

Here’s how I made the Pontefract “Buttercross and St Giles Church” 3D Acrylic Painting

Here’s a video of it, on my youtube channel: youtube.com/purplefayecouk

About the Pontefract Buttercross and St Giles Church 

The focal point of Pontefract town centre, in the market place, is the Buttercross, which was built in 1734.

As the inscription on the south side states, the Buttercross was “Erected by Mrs Elizabeth Dupier, relict of Solomon Dupier, gentleman, in a cheerful and generous compliance with his benevolent intention, 1734”

When first constructed, the Buttercross had a flat roof surrounded by a balustrade but this was replaced by the present hipped roof at a cost of £46-3-10d during August and September 1763. Such covered market crosses were common during the eighteenth century but the Buttercross is a much more substantial structure than most others and is unusual in its rectangular plan. It continued to fulfil its original function as a market shelter for farmers wives with their baskets of dairy produce well into the 20th century but other more extraordinary transactions have taken place at the Buttercross during its existence such as wife selling.

Behind the Buttercross is situated St. Giles Church, which was built in the first few years of the 12′h century as a chapel-of-ease to All Saints’ Church, but due to the ruin of All Saints, Saint Giles became the Parish Church in 1789.

The Grade II listed building with its unique octagonal tower visible for miles around, proclaims the Glory of God to the people of Pontefract and its many visitors.

There has been some sort of religious building on the site since at least the 12th Century, although today’s building is generally associated with Georgian architecture.

(Find out more at pontefractus.co.uk)

 

If you have any questions or would like to comment then please do so below or email me at info@purplefaye.co.uk

 

Till next time,

Take care

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

 

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How I made The Flying Scotsman 3D Acrylic Painting

How I made The Flying Scotsman 3D Acrylic Painting.

(See the video on youtube.com/purplefayecouk)

If you have any questions or comments then please feel free to leave them below or email me at info@purplefaye.co.uk

About The Flying Scotsman No. 4472 (taken from wikipedia.org)

LNER Class A3 4472 Flying Scotsman is a Pacific steam locomotive built in 1923 for the London and North Eastern Railway (LNER) at Doncaster Works to a design of Nigel Gresley. It was employed on long-distance express East Coast Main Line trains by the LNER and its successors, British Railways Eastern and North-Eastern Regions, notably on the London to Edinburgh Flying Scotsman train service after which it was named.

The locomotive set two world records for steam traction, becoming the first steam locomotive to be officially authenticated at reaching 100 miles per hour (160.9 km/h) on 30 November 1934, and then setting a record for the longest non-stop run by a steam locomotive when it ran 422 miles (679 km) on 8 August 1989 while in Australia.

Retired from regular service in 1963 after covering 2.08 million miles, Flying Scotsman gained considerable fame in preservation under the ownership of, successively, Alan Pegler, William McAlpine, Tony Marchington, and finally the National Railway Museum (NRM). As well as hauling enthusiast specials in the United Kingdom, the locomotive toured extensively in the United States and Canada from 1969 until 1973 and Australia in 1988/89. Flying Scotsman has been described as the world’s most famous steam locomotive.

History

The locomotive was completed in 1923, construction having been started under the auspices of the Great Northern Railway (GNR). It was built as an A1, initially carrying the GNR number 1472, because the LNER had not yet decided on a system-wide numbering scheme.

Flying Scotsman was something of a flagship locomotive for the LNER. It represented the company at the British Empire Exhibition at Wembley in 1924 and 1925. Before this event, in February 1924 it acquired its name and the new number of 4472. From then on it was commonly used for promotional purposes.

With suitably modified valve gear, this locomotive was one of five Gresley Pacifics selected to haul the prestigious non-stop Flying Scotsman train service from London to Edinburgh, hauling the inaugural train on 1 May 1928. For this the locomotives ran with a new version of the large eight-wheel tender which held nine long tons of coal. This and the usual facility for water replenishment from the water trough system enabled them to travel the 392 miles (631 km) from London to Edinburgh in eight hours non-stop.

The tender included a corridor connection and tunnel through the water tank giving access to the locomotive cab from the train so that the driver and fireman could be changed without stopping the train. The following year the locomotive appeared in the film The Flying Scotsman.

While the Great Western Railway locomotive City of Truro had previously been unofficially timed at running in excess of 100 mph (160.9 km/h), 4472 became the first steam locomotive to be officially authenticated at this speed on 30 November 1934, driven by Bill Sparshatt and running a light test train. It earned a place in the land speed record for railed vehicles; the publicity-conscious LNER made much of the fact.

The locomotive ran with its corridor tender between April 1928 and October 1936, after which it reverted to the original type; in July 1938 it was paired with a streamlined non-corridor tender, and ran with this type until withdrawal. On 22 August 1928 an improved version of this Pacific type, classified A3, appeared; older A1 locomotives were later rebuilt to conform. On 25 April 1945, A1-class locomotives not yet rebuilt were reclassified A10 to make way for newer Thompson and Peppercorn Pacifics. Flying Scotsman emerged from Doncaster Works on 4 January 1947 as an A3, having received a boiler with the long “banjo” dome of the type it carries today. By this time it had been renumbered twice: under Edward Thompson’s comprehensive renumbering scheme for the LNER, it became No. 502 in January 1946; in May the same year, under an amendment to that plan, it become No. 103. Following nationalisation of the railways on 1 January 1948, almost all of the LNER locomotive numbers were increased by 60000; No. 103 became 60103 in December 1948.

Between 5 June 1950 and 4 July 1954, and between 26 December 1954 and 1 September 1957, under British Railways ownership, it was allocated to Leicester Central shed on the Great Central Railway, running Nottingham Victoria to London Marylebone services via Leicester Central.

All A3 Pacifics were subsequently fitted with a double Kylchap chimney to improve performance and economy. This caused soft exhaust and smoke drift that tended to obscure the driver’s forward vision; the remedy was found in the German-type smoke deflectors fitted from 1960, which somewhat changed the locomotives’ appearance.[15]

Preservation

In 1962, British Railways announced that it would scrap Flying Scotsman. Number 60103 ended service with its last scheduled run on 14 January 1963. Proposed to be saved by a group called “Save Our Scotsman”, they were unable to raise the required £3,000, the scrap value of the locomotive.

With the locomotive effectively placed up for sale, after a national campaign it was bought in April 2004 by the National Railway Museum in York, and it is now part of the museum’s National Collection. After 12 months of interim running repairs, it ran for a while to raise funds for its 10-year restoration.

Overhaul 2006–2016

In January 2006, Flying Scotsman entered the National Railway Museum’s workshops for a major overhaul to return it to Gresley’s original specification and to renew its boiler certificate; originally planned to be completed by mid-2010 if sufficient funds were raised, but late discovery of additional problems meant it would not be completed on time.  In October 2012, the museum published a report examining the reasons for the delay and additional cost. The locomotive was moved in October 2013 to Bury for work to return it to running condition in 2015. On 29 April 2015, Flying Scotsman‘s boiler left the National Railway Museum to be reunited with the rest of the locomotive at Riley & Sons in Bury.[42]

The bay in which the locomotive was being refurbished was on view to visitors to the NRM but the engine was rapidly dismantled to such an extent that the running plate was the only component recognisable to the casual observer. Early in 2009 it emerged that the overhaul would see the loco reunited with the last remaining genuine A3 boiler (acquired at the same time as the locomotive as a spare). The A4 boiler that the loco had used since the early 1980s was sold to Jeremy Hosking for potential use on his locomotive, LNER Class A4 4464 Bittern.

Return to service

The overhaul was completed in January 2016 and testing began on the East Lancashire Railway on 8 January 2016. Flying Scotsman was originally going to haul its inaugural mainline train called the Winter Cumbrian Mountain Express from Manchester Victoria to Carlisle on 23 January, but it was not ready due to faulty brakes. The first mainline run, pulling the Winter Cumbrian Mountain Express from Carnforth to Carlisle, took place on 6 February. An inaugural journey from London King’s Cross to York in traditional green livery ran on 25 February. Flying Scotsman will be making special tours throughout the UK in 2016.

 

If you have any questions or comments then please feel free to leave them below or email me at info@purplefaye.co.uk

Till next time

Take care

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk