Artist Purple Faye Art Adventure: Light Night Leeds Friday 5th October 2018

“Light Night is one of the UK’s largest annual arts and light festivals, and over two special nights some of Leeds’ most recognisable indoor and outdoor spaces will be transformed by spectacular artworks and captivating performances by local, national and international artists.

This year we celebrate the themes of progress and innovation, kicking off with a vibrant illuminated parade celebrating 100 years of social change since (some) women got the vote.

On Light Night you will discover over 60 arts events across ten zones in the city centre; from large-scale light projections and interactive artworks, to music, dance and street performances.

Among the highlights this year will be an incredible abstract digital projection that will use the historic stonework of Leeds Civic Hall as its canvas, while elsewhere giant illuminated humanoids will appear on rooftops and public spaces around the city centre.

The Leeds Library, one of the city’s hidden treasures, will be the backdrop for a celebration of Leeds suffragettes, Leonora Cohen and Mary Gawthorpe, and a fearsome and fiery dragon will be making an appearance on the Queens Hotel! So, bring your family and friends along to experience a fantastic festival atmosphere and see the city in a new light!”whatson.leeds.gov.uk/lightnight

This year was the 14th edition of Light Night Leeds which again took place over 2 days, Thursday the 4th and Friday the 5th of October 6pm-11pm. It was only the 3rd year that I’ve attended the event. My first year, in 2016, was also the first year that it become a 2 day/night event, previously it only took place over a single evening.

My first time at Light NIght Leeds was on my own in 2016, which you can read about here. My second time attending was last year, 2017, and my boyfriend came with me for his first experience of the event, read about that one here. This year, 2018, there was a little gang of us. My boyfriend came again and coming for their first time was my mum, my younger sister and my little 3 month old nephew.

We were able to attend the event on Friday, as I had the previous 2 years too, unfortunately the weather wasn’t as dry as it had been on the Thursday but we weren’t going to let it stop us. (It did mean that I didn’t take quite so many photos though.)

We started with the Tai Shani ‘Semiramis’ exhibition at The Tetley, which is a gallery in the former Tetley brewery building on Hunslet Road.

We then walked up to the Headrow, passing by one of the ‘Fantastic Planet’ giant humanoids by Amanda Parer and the ‘Spectral’ rainbow lights by KASJO studio in St John the Evangelist Church gardens.

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Making our way to the First Direct Arena to see the special light show on the building, via the ‘Sound Of Infinity’ walk in infinity mirror by Kira Zhigalina, then crossing over to Queen Square to see ‘Dr Kronovator’s Fire Laboratory’ by Emergency Exit Arts.

Next stop was Millenium Square to see ‘Chaos’ by Hotaru Visual Guerrilla projected onto the building.

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As we headed down towards Queens Hotel to see the dragon projected onto the building we passed through ‘Bouquet D’abat Jour (Lampshaeds Bouquet)’ by Tilt.

We finished our Light Night adventure by seeing ‘Moon Beam’ by Cirque Bijou at the Trinity Shopping centre.

I shot a few videos which I’ll be posting on social media, I can’t post them on here, so if you’d like to see them find me on Instagram and Facebook. I’m /purplefaye.co.uk on both.

I really enjoyed the evening, even if the weather could have been better. I’m already looking forward to going again next year.

Hopefully this has given you an idea of what Light Night Leeds is like.

Till next time.

Take care

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

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Purple Faye Art Adventure: Light Night Leeds Friday 6th October 2017

On Friday 6th October 2017 we went to Light Night Leeds. I’d gone for the first time last year, read about it here, and was really looking forward to going again this year.

​”Light Night Leeds is an annual free multi-arts and light festival which takes over Leeds City Centre on two nights in early October.

Witness the city centre come alive with an exciting programme of spectacular projections, interactive installations, exhibitions, dance, music and street performances. As darkness falls, come and see the city in a new light…”

There was so much to see that before we set off I’d made a list of the main ones that I wanted to see and we still ran out of time to see those never mind everything else that was going on too.

It starts at 6pm and finishes at 11pm but it’s still light at 6pm so quite a few things don’t really start until it gets dark.

The first thing we saw was the DJ Dukebox at Dortmund Square, but it was still too light really so we went for something to eat while it got darker.

 

Once it was dark we went to the Town Hall and Civic Hall to see POP – Blauwe Uur and Out of the Aire – Ross Ashton (the projection Studio) projected onto the buidlings.

Next we went up to Leeds Uni, taking in the Dry Dock on the way, and saw Voices of Light and Dark – Various poetry readings, Soapbox Art and Science – Various, Connecting the Marshall Threads – Alice Clayden and Vessel – Jim Bond, Paul Beales and Barbara Ciani.

We then walked over to Queen Square for Wannabe Leodis – Leeds Beckett Uni and Around the Campfire – Morwenna Catt.

Next stop was the City Museum for Hackspace Cubed – Leeds Hackspace then the Central Library for Light Benches – LBO Litchbankobjeckte Uncanny Theatre.

We only had about an hour left by this time so we started heading to the docks making sure we stopped at the Queens Hotel for Harlequin by NOVAK feat. Ed Carter and Beating Heart – Stuart Langley on the new platfrom building at the train station. Then through Granary Wharf via Heofon Light Maze – Ben Busche, Brut Deluxe. We looked at getting the free water taxi to take us to Leeds Dock but we wouldn’t have got there in time if we had.

So with 5 mins left we finally got to Leeds Dock to see the thing that I’d been most looking forward to seeing all night, Museum of the Moon – Luke Jerram. It didn’t disappoint so I was really pleased we managed to get to see it before they turned it off at 11pm. Which they did bang on time with everyone booing as they did it.

So then it was home and bed time, tired after all the walking but having had a really enjoyable evening. They only started doing Light NIght Leeds on two nights last year but there’s so much to see and do that it’s good that they did. I think if I want to see more next year I’ll have to go for both evenings. Hopefully these pics have given you an idea of what it was like, and also how many other people were out and about enjoying the events too. The city was so busy which made it more difficult to get round quickly but it’s nice to see so many people enjoying art.

Next art adventure should be Illuminating York but sadly it’s been cancelled this year and is now going to happen every two years rather than annually, you can read about my trip to it last year here though.

 

Till next time,

Take care.

Purple Faye

purplefaye.co.uk

 

Art Adventure – Light Night Leeds 2016

Last Friday (7th october 2016) I went on an adventure to Leeds for Light Night Leeds.

“As darkness falls, come and see the city in a new light…..”

I’d not been to “Leeds’ biggest free annual multi-arts event”before so I’d been looking forward to going this year. Especially as this year was it’s 12th anniversary, and for the first time it took place over two nights, Thursday 6th and Friday 7th.

“Exploring the elements earth, wind, water and fire the city came alive with over 50 artworks including spectacular light projections, as well as film, dance, music, theatre, exhibitions and street performances.”

As it was still light when I got there at 6pm I started by walking up from the train station towards the Library. As I got closer I looked up at the Town Hall to see the pink lighting showing up as it started to get dark.

Next I looked across at the Waterlight Graffiti, Antonin Fourneau, Victoria Gardens (The Headrow, LS1 3AA Thursday and Friday 6 –11pm) an interactive installation made of a wall embedded with thousands of LEDs which light up if their surface is touched by water. Anything damp becomes a tool to drive or write: a sponge, a brush, a water gun, or even a water atomizer to act as an eco-friendly graffiti artist. Developed by French artist, Antonin Fourneau, the project was research led and explores water-sensitive materials.

Then just outside the Library was The Indestructible Reef, Alison M Smith, Victoria Gardens (The Headrow, LS1 3AA Thursday and Friday 6 –11pm) a series of glowing sculptures created from recycled plastic, crafted to mimic organic forms. Alison Smith transforms waste materials into beautiful objects. She aims to illustrate the effects waste plastics have on our oceans, with plastic particles already outweighing plankton by 26:1 in some areas.

I entered Leeds Central Library, (Central Library, Calverley Street, LS1 3AB, Friday 5 –10pm) to Explore the Elements. Encountering the unexpected through art and crafts, films and displays created especially for the night. Stories of lost voyages and daring expeditions through the rare books and historic maps in the beautiful Grade II* listed building.

Also in the Library: Owl’s Shadow on the Moonlit Earth, Douglas Thompson (Central Library, Calverley Street, LS1 3AB, Friday 6 –10pm) a 3D shadow show inspired by Robert Plack’s elemental poem “The Snowy Owl”. Meet your shadow on the screen and make magical images that leap out into space as you participate in this original performance by artist Douglas Thompson with live music by Max Trewhitt.

And  H2Us, Artlink West Yorkshire & Love Arts (Central Library, Calverley Street, LS1 3AB
Friday 6 –10pm) We are over 50% water. H2Us is a sculpture with droplets floating in the frame representing our connection with water. The constantly moving droplets will glimmer and glitter as they turn in the rising air currents. Participants will be invited, alongside artists Jim Bond and Rozi Fuller, to create their own lanterns inspired by the sculpture.

Next I walked to Briggate for Ethereal Freeze, Glacial Art Ice Sculptors (Briggate, LS1 6LX Friday 6 – 11pm) a transient installation, using ice and light to capture the fleeting beauty of fire, wind, earth and water.

And the Local Artisans’ Market (Briggate, LS1 6LX Friday 3pm –10.30pm) a market displaying the work of local artisans, a wide range of handmade gifts and lively atmosphere on one of Leeds’ most famous streets. A variety of art, ceramics, print and silversmithing. Where I met the lovely Perky Painter Helen Gibson.

From Briggate I walked up to St John the Evangelist Church to see Elemental, Hannah Stained Glass (St John the Evangelist Church Gardens, Mark Lane, LS2 8JA Friday 6 –11pm)
Four hand-crafted stained glass windows cast their magic and transport you on a journey through the elements. Travel from earth, through the air, out of the fire and into the cooling water created by colour and light.

And then inside the church itself for [in]visible, Si ieng Fung  (St John the Evangelist Church, Mark Lane, LS2 8JA Friday 6 –11pm) Artist, Si ieng Fung, uses transparent materials to shed light upon the marvellous architectural detail of historical buildings in Leeds. [in]visible reveals all that has faded into the background of this modern metropolitan city. Visitors are invited to share which buildings have played parts in their lives.

Just round the back of the church were The Giant Dandelions, Olivia d’Aboville (Merrion Gardens, Merrion Street, LS2 8JG Thursday and Friday 6 – 11pm) The Giant Dandelions installation is a forest of 90 giant lit flowers. Through manipulating over 9,000 recycled bottles, the artist refers to our consumerist society that is polluting our environment. She creates work that is sensitive to light, fluidity and movement, allowing you to walk through the forest with a more sensitive connection to the environment.

Next I went over to Millennium Square to see The Phoenix in the Stone, Illuminos (Civic Hall, Millennium Square, LS1 1UR Thursday and Friday 7.30pm –11pm) Returning after the epic Momentous (2013), Illuminos present The Phoenix in the Stone, a beautiful fable for the four quarters of Yorkshire, weaved from shadow and light. Watch the metamorphosis as the firebird soars, projected onto the Civic Hall.

Then inside The Carriageworks for Afterglow, Atipyka-Visualab (Auditorium, The Carriageworks, Millennium Square, LS2 3AD Friday 6 –11pm) a cubic frame audio-visual installation. A series of geometric animations are projected through six semi-transparent screens. With an unusual usage of light, the audience are surrounded by an audio-visual journey where time and space is bent upon itself, creating a new dimension inside the structure and guiding the viewers through the four basic natural elements.

And over to Leeds City College, Technology Campus (Cookridge Street, LS2 8BL Friday 7.30 –11pm) to see the work projected on a billboard showcasing an eclectic assortment of student work, encapsulating the symbiotic spirit of the elements. Through projections of creative arts, games, animation and videos, spectators can revel in the delights of the achievements of college students and enjoy the diversity of talent and creativity.

Before walking up to Queen Square to see the Fire Balls, Aragorn Dick-Read (Queen Square, LS2 8AJ, Friday 6 – 11pm) Large cut out steel shapes by Caribbean artist, Aragorn Dick-Read, set alight as night sets in. These provocative sculptures evoke primal energy and use the vitality of fire to bring life to his intricately cut designs. Dancing figures embracing nature, or profound symbolic patterns that embody the oppositions faced by culture and the elements.

Past the Light Show on the outside of First Direct Arena (Clay Pit Lane, LS2 8BY, Friday 7 –11pm) Leeds’ flagship event space, First Direct Arena, hosts exciting live music, comedy, spectacular entertainment and sporting events. For Light Night, they are putting on an extra special light display.

Down to the Love Arts Festival at Leeds Corn Exchange (Call Lane, LS1 7BR Friday 6 –11pm)
Pop up exhibitions, performances, DJs, live music and workshops that promote the idea that being creative is good for your mental health. Events will take place underground on the Piazza level of Leeds Corn Exchange. Join in the arts party under the Earth! Presented by Love Arts Festival and the Art of Recovery.

Across to We are Universe, Leeds College of Music, Northern School of Contemporary Dance, Leeds College of Art, Oscar Barany, Nicolas Dixon, Motiv Productions. Supported by Leeds BID (Kirkgate Market Event Space, 28-34 George St, LS2 7HY Friday 6.30 –11pm)
This collaborative installation of improvised music, dance, digital visual art and animation, explores the relationship between the elements in the universe and the human interactions which make up our communities. Internationally renowned artist Nicolas Dixon has been commissioned to paint the 100ft wall inside the iconic Kirkgate Market. To mark the unveiling of this stunning new work on Light Night, award winning Leeds based video production company Motiv Productions will be augmenting the piece with brand new animations.

Then sadly it was time to make my way back to the train station to catch the last train home so I finished with The Falls, Dave Lynch (Queens Hotel, City Square, LS1 1PJ Thursday and Friday 7.30 –11pm) a creative exploration of the flow and form of water. A 100ft digital waterfall taking us on a journey from the abstract to the hyper real, driven in perfect synchronization by a musical score inspired by the chaotic forces of nature’s white noise.

There was so much more to see that I didn’t have time to, but I had a great time seeing all the things that I did get to and even though there was a bit of drizzle here and there it was nice to see that so many other people were enjoing it all too.

 

Information taken from the Light Night Leeds 2016 Guide  find out more at

http://whatson.leeds.gov.uk/lightnight/Documents/Light%20Night%20guide%202016.pdf

 

Till next time,

Take care

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

 

 

Visit to the Leeds College of Art (Vernon Street site) End Of Year Show 2016 “Made Here.”

On Thursday 16th June 2016 I went to see the last day of the Leeds College of Art (Vernon Street site) End Of Year Show “Made Here.” The college is “celebrating 170 years delivering art education by hosting an innovative collection of final year student work”. It featured the work from the

  • Extended Diploma – Fashion & Textiles,
  • Extended Diploma – Graphic Communication
  • Extended Diploma – Fine Art
  • Extended Diploma – 3D
  • Level 2 Diploma in Visual Arts Access to HE Diploma (Art & Design)

I’d gone to see the work of the lovely Fiona Kearns, she’d been telling me about the ceramic work she’d been making as part of her Diploma in Visual Arts and I was looking forward to seeing it (and touching it, as I’d been encouraged to do). I’m pleased to say that she got a distiction for it, and quite rightly so in my opinion.

 

 

Unfortunately I didn’t have time to make it up to the Blenheim Walk building to see all the work and the art market there, so much to see and so little time. I did really enjoy getting to see what I did have time for though. I walked out of the building reminiscing about my time at college and uni and feeling inspired to continue with my own creative endeavours.

If you weren’t able to make it then hopefully the pics I took will help give you a taster of some of the brilliant creatives coming from the Leeds College of Art.

A bit about:

“Leeds College of Art is one of only a few independent art schools in the UK, our students enjoy a small, close-knit community in a creative atmosphere where anything feels possible. We believe this is the best environment in which to grow as an artist or designer.

To a great extent, our reputation goes before us: Henry Moore and Barbara Hepworth studied here, as did, more recently, Marcus Harvey, Damien Hirst, Danny Sangra and Omar Kashoura. However, we never allow complacency. We work extremely hard to remain a leading centre for art and design education, choosing from among the brightest international potential to produce some of the most sought-after creative talent.

In the Guardian Education League Tables 2015 we are the highest ranked independent art college in the UK. Excellent staff: student ratios mean you’ll benefit from as much personal attention and expert advice as you’ll need.

Whether you join us to study for a degree, masters or a further education course (after GCSEs or A levels), you’ll encounter a friendly and supportive environment at Leeds College of Art. Our students settle in quickly, benefiting from the best possible start to their studies.” find out more at www.leeds-art.ac.uk

 

 

Take care,

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

How I made the Pontefract “Buttercross and St Giles Church” 3D Acrylic Painting

Here’s how I made the Pontefract “Buttercross and St Giles Church” 3D Acrylic Painting

Here’s a video of it, on my youtube channel: youtube.com/purplefayecouk

About the Pontefract Buttercross and St Giles Church 

The focal point of Pontefract town centre, in the market place, is the Buttercross, which was built in 1734.

As the inscription on the south side states, the Buttercross was “Erected by Mrs Elizabeth Dupier, relict of Solomon Dupier, gentleman, in a cheerful and generous compliance with his benevolent intention, 1734”

When first constructed, the Buttercross had a flat roof surrounded by a balustrade but this was replaced by the present hipped roof at a cost of £46-3-10d during August and September 1763. Such covered market crosses were common during the eighteenth century but the Buttercross is a much more substantial structure than most others and is unusual in its rectangular plan. It continued to fulfil its original function as a market shelter for farmers wives with their baskets of dairy produce well into the 20th century but other more extraordinary transactions have taken place at the Buttercross during its existence such as wife selling.

Behind the Buttercross is situated St. Giles Church, which was built in the first few years of the 12′h century as a chapel-of-ease to All Saints’ Church, but due to the ruin of All Saints, Saint Giles became the Parish Church in 1789.

The Grade II listed building with its unique octagonal tower visible for miles around, proclaims the Glory of God to the people of Pontefract and its many visitors.

There has been some sort of religious building on the site since at least the 12th Century, although today’s building is generally associated with Georgian architecture.

(Find out more at pontefractus.co.uk)

 

If you have any questions or would like to comment then please do so below or email me at info@purplefaye.co.uk

 

Till next time,

Take care

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

 

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How I made The Flying Scotsman 3D Acrylic Painting

How I made The Flying Scotsman 3D Acrylic Painting.

(See the video on youtube.com/purplefayecouk)

If you have any questions or comments then please feel free to leave them below or email me at info@purplefaye.co.uk

About The Flying Scotsman No. 4472 (taken from wikipedia.org)

LNER Class A3 4472 Flying Scotsman is a Pacific steam locomotive built in 1923 for the London and North Eastern Railway (LNER) at Doncaster Works to a design of Nigel Gresley. It was employed on long-distance express East Coast Main Line trains by the LNER and its successors, British Railways Eastern and North-Eastern Regions, notably on the London to Edinburgh Flying Scotsman train service after which it was named.

The locomotive set two world records for steam traction, becoming the first steam locomotive to be officially authenticated at reaching 100 miles per hour (160.9 km/h) on 30 November 1934, and then setting a record for the longest non-stop run by a steam locomotive when it ran 422 miles (679 km) on 8 August 1989 while in Australia.

Retired from regular service in 1963 after covering 2.08 million miles, Flying Scotsman gained considerable fame in preservation under the ownership of, successively, Alan Pegler, William McAlpine, Tony Marchington, and finally the National Railway Museum (NRM). As well as hauling enthusiast specials in the United Kingdom, the locomotive toured extensively in the United States and Canada from 1969 until 1973 and Australia in 1988/89. Flying Scotsman has been described as the world’s most famous steam locomotive.

History

The locomotive was completed in 1923, construction having been started under the auspices of the Great Northern Railway (GNR). It was built as an A1, initially carrying the GNR number 1472, because the LNER had not yet decided on a system-wide numbering scheme.

Flying Scotsman was something of a flagship locomotive for the LNER. It represented the company at the British Empire Exhibition at Wembley in 1924 and 1925. Before this event, in February 1924 it acquired its name and the new number of 4472. From then on it was commonly used for promotional purposes.

With suitably modified valve gear, this locomotive was one of five Gresley Pacifics selected to haul the prestigious non-stop Flying Scotsman train service from London to Edinburgh, hauling the inaugural train on 1 May 1928. For this the locomotives ran with a new version of the large eight-wheel tender which held nine long tons of coal. This and the usual facility for water replenishment from the water trough system enabled them to travel the 392 miles (631 km) from London to Edinburgh in eight hours non-stop.

The tender included a corridor connection and tunnel through the water tank giving access to the locomotive cab from the train so that the driver and fireman could be changed without stopping the train. The following year the locomotive appeared in the film The Flying Scotsman.

While the Great Western Railway locomotive City of Truro had previously been unofficially timed at running in excess of 100 mph (160.9 km/h), 4472 became the first steam locomotive to be officially authenticated at this speed on 30 November 1934, driven by Bill Sparshatt and running a light test train. It earned a place in the land speed record for railed vehicles; the publicity-conscious LNER made much of the fact.

The locomotive ran with its corridor tender between April 1928 and October 1936, after which it reverted to the original type; in July 1938 it was paired with a streamlined non-corridor tender, and ran with this type until withdrawal. On 22 August 1928 an improved version of this Pacific type, classified A3, appeared; older A1 locomotives were later rebuilt to conform. On 25 April 1945, A1-class locomotives not yet rebuilt were reclassified A10 to make way for newer Thompson and Peppercorn Pacifics. Flying Scotsman emerged from Doncaster Works on 4 January 1947 as an A3, having received a boiler with the long “banjo” dome of the type it carries today. By this time it had been renumbered twice: under Edward Thompson’s comprehensive renumbering scheme for the LNER, it became No. 502 in January 1946; in May the same year, under an amendment to that plan, it become No. 103. Following nationalisation of the railways on 1 January 1948, almost all of the LNER locomotive numbers were increased by 60000; No. 103 became 60103 in December 1948.

Between 5 June 1950 and 4 July 1954, and between 26 December 1954 and 1 September 1957, under British Railways ownership, it was allocated to Leicester Central shed on the Great Central Railway, running Nottingham Victoria to London Marylebone services via Leicester Central.

All A3 Pacifics were subsequently fitted with a double Kylchap chimney to improve performance and economy. This caused soft exhaust and smoke drift that tended to obscure the driver’s forward vision; the remedy was found in the German-type smoke deflectors fitted from 1960, which somewhat changed the locomotives’ appearance.[15]

Preservation

In 1962, British Railways announced that it would scrap Flying Scotsman. Number 60103 ended service with its last scheduled run on 14 January 1963. Proposed to be saved by a group called “Save Our Scotsman”, they were unable to raise the required £3,000, the scrap value of the locomotive.

With the locomotive effectively placed up for sale, after a national campaign it was bought in April 2004 by the National Railway Museum in York, and it is now part of the museum’s National Collection. After 12 months of interim running repairs, it ran for a while to raise funds for its 10-year restoration.

Overhaul 2006–2016

In January 2006, Flying Scotsman entered the National Railway Museum’s workshops for a major overhaul to return it to Gresley’s original specification and to renew its boiler certificate; originally planned to be completed by mid-2010 if sufficient funds were raised, but late discovery of additional problems meant it would not be completed on time.  In October 2012, the museum published a report examining the reasons for the delay and additional cost. The locomotive was moved in October 2013 to Bury for work to return it to running condition in 2015. On 29 April 2015, Flying Scotsman‘s boiler left the National Railway Museum to be reunited with the rest of the locomotive at Riley & Sons in Bury.[42]

The bay in which the locomotive was being refurbished was on view to visitors to the NRM but the engine was rapidly dismantled to such an extent that the running plate was the only component recognisable to the casual observer. Early in 2009 it emerged that the overhaul would see the loco reunited with the last remaining genuine A3 boiler (acquired at the same time as the locomotive as a spare). The A4 boiler that the loco had used since the early 1980s was sold to Jeremy Hosking for potential use on his locomotive, LNER Class A4 4464 Bittern.

Return to service

The overhaul was completed in January 2016 and testing began on the East Lancashire Railway on 8 January 2016. Flying Scotsman was originally going to haul its inaugural mainline train called the Winter Cumbrian Mountain Express from Manchester Victoria to Carlisle on 23 January, but it was not ready due to faulty brakes. The first mainline run, pulling the Winter Cumbrian Mountain Express from Carnforth to Carlisle, took place on 6 February. An inaugural journey from London King’s Cross to York in traditional green livery ran on 25 February. Flying Scotsman will be making special tours throughout the UK in 2016.

 

If you have any questions or comments then please feel free to leave them below or email me at info@purplefaye.co.uk

Till next time

Take care

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

Art adventure: Illustrators Louisa Foley & Thom Milson Exhibition at Munrow House, Leeds

On Monday (14th March 2016) we went to visit the Louisa Foley & Thom Milson Exhibition at Munrow House, Leeds. Here are a few photos from our trip….

 

About the exhibition:

“An exhibition of work by two talented Illustrators, who we think are super.

Louisa Foley

Louisa Foley graduated from Leeds college of Art studying printed textiles and surface pattern.

Louisa says:

My practice is heavily illustration based combining a number of different techniques including: Hand drawn illustrations, collage, Digital printing, Hand embellishments and embroidery. I love colour, surrealism, and typography these all play a large role in my work which is inspired by a mash up of 60’s graphics, pop art, punk, kitsch and feminism. This eclectic mix leads me to some strange places but definitely reflect my playful sense of humour. I like to make work that catches peoples eye and makes them laugh, i believe life is too short to be serious and beige and my work is a visual way of saying this, rather than being polite and asking to be seen it screams in your face ‘HELLO I HAVE ARRIVED’“.

For more information:
Louisa’s Website / Louisa’s Instagram

Thom Milson

Thom Milson is an illustrator based in Leeds. As a graduate of Leeds Beckett University, with a degree in Fine Art, Thom has gone on to work with a wide range of clients in a range of mediums – as well as pursuing regular personal passion projects, such as those seen in this exhibit. Working regularly in inks, printmaking, digital illustration and paper cuts, his work explores the relationship between handmade and digital process, creating a word that feels alien yet familiar.

For more information:
Thom’s Website / Thom’s Instagram” taken from leedsgallery.com

A bit about the Gallery at Munrow House:

“The Gallery at Munro House is an independent commercial art gallery, event space, and café in Leeds. Our aim is to support local arts and culture while also bringing artists and their work to the city from further afield.

From our city centre location we exhibit and represent artists specialising in all types of art, including photography, illustration, painting, print, sculpture, animation, film, and graphic design.

Since opening in September 2011 we have exhibited an eclectic mix of styles and media from both established and emerging talents; exhibitions range from photography to illustration, painting, printmaking and sculpture. The space also hosts a wide-ranging programme of events and is available to hire for functions and private exhibitions.

Situated inside Munro House in the East of Leeds, Gallery Munro House is not to be confused with Leeds City Art Gallery. We are situated at the corner of York Street and Duke Street in LS9 – view a map of the gallery location – just moments from the City Centre, around the corner from BBC Yorkshire and opposite the City Bus Station.” leedsgallery.com

To find out more about Munrow House visit their website munro-house.co.uk

 

The exhibition is only on until the 31st March (2016) so if you want to go see it for yourself you’ve only got a few days left.

Admission is free

Open times: 8am-6pm Mon-Fri

10am-6pm Saturday

Closed Sunday

 

Till next time

Take care

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk