How artist Purple Faye made the ‘Mummy and Baby African Elephants’ 3D acrylic painting

Do you like elephants?

Here’s how I made the ‘Mummy and Baby African Elephants’ 3D acrylic painting.

It was made while I still had my shop studio space in Castleford, see more about that here, after I’d completed the ‘African Elephant’ 3D acrylic painting and was pleased with how it had turned out. (See the making of that one in this blog post I wrote about it.)

This was one of the first of my 3D acrylic paintings that I had made into embossed printed greetings cards. The embossed printing means that they are raised to reflect the 3D nature of the original painting. I still have a few available for sale from my etsy shop here.

My 3D acrylic paintings are made by drawing directly onto the cardboard that I have carefully selected and cut down to the size of the canvas I’m going to use. I then cut out the drawing and layer up the cardboard to make it 3D. The cardboard layers are then stuck down onto the blank canvas and covered with modroc (bandage with plaster of paris impregnated). Once the modroc is completely dry I then paint it with acrylic paints.

 

If you’d like to try the technique for yourself I have a selection of kits available from my etsy shop: etsy.com/uk/shop/purplefayeshop

Any questions or comments get in touch info@purplefaye.co.uk or message me on social media.

 

Till next time.

Take care.

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

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How artist Purple Faye made the large square ‘Unicorn’ 3D acrylic painting using a Purple Faye ‘Make Your Own Unicorn 3D Picture Kit’.

I wanted to have a finished ‘Unicorn’ 3D acrylic painting to show people who are interested in my kits, when I do craft fairs etc, so I thought it would be helpful to make it using one of the kits I’d made so i can show you how I do it.

If you’ve bought a kit from me to make your own square unicorn 3D picture then hopefully you should find this useful if you get stuck when making yours.

If you don’t have one of my kits yet but you’d like one then you can buy them from my etsy shop or message me/ email info@purplefaye.co.uk

 

 

I used the template to get the shape and followed my instructions of which bits to cut out to make it 3D. Once all my cardboard layers were stuck together on the canvas I then covered it in modroc, adding texture as per my instructions. I then used acrylic paints, mixing my own pastel colours to get the shades that I wanted, to paint it once the modroc was completely dry.

This video shows how I put the modroc on:

This video show’s how I used acrylic paints to paint it.

 

If you need any help with your kits or if there’s a kit that you would like me to make for you then please get in touch. Comment below, message me, or email info@purplefaye.co.uk

 

Till next time.

Take care.

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

Making of the Teddies 3D Acrylic Paintings by artist Purple Faye

Here’s how I made the original ‘Teddy’ and ‘Teddy 2’ 3D acrylic paintings.

I made these after I’d finished making a previous 3D acrylic painting for my boyfriend’s niece Eden. I was pleased with how the teddy came out on it so I wanted to try making some more. I decided to make a pair as I felt that they would look nice waving at each other side by side in a child’s bedroom. I chose neutral colours, creamy light yellow and greys so it would work with any colour scheme in a child’s bedroom, making it easier to give as a gift.

I used my usual technique for making my 3D acrylic paintings, starting with the drawing on cardboard. Even though I was making a pair that I wanted to be similar to each other, the nature of the technique means that they wouldn’t be identical. I drew the first one on cardboard and then cut it out. I then used this as a template by flipping it over so I could get the mirror image for the second one. I then created more subtle layers by overlapping certain areas to raise them slightly as well as making more dramatic layers with extra pieces of cardboard cut to shape for the nose and one foot. Once these were all stuck down in place on the canvas I used the modroc to create slight texture in the fur then I begun to paint them with acrylic paints once the modroc was dry.

 

If you’d like to buy these, either just one or the pair, they are still available, I also have embossed greetings cards available.

If you would like to make one for yourself let me know and I can put together a kit for you.

Leave a comment or email me at info@purplefaye.co.uk

 

Till next time,

Take care.

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

How Artist Purple Faye Made the Highland Cow 3D Acrylic Paintings at Holmfirth Artweek Artist Demonstrations 6th &7th July 2018

This year I took part in the artist demonstrations at Holmfirth Artweek on Friday the 6th and Saturday the 7th of July. It was my 4th year of doing this, you can see my previous posts about being there here: 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018

I decided to work on some of the Highland cows that I have been making at previous artist demonstrations that I’ve been taking part in. I had 3 at 3 different stages, modroc stage, base coat paint stage and more painting stage.

I worked on the smaller one first as that had the least amount of work to do to it.

I then worked on the one that had a base coat of paint on. Buliding up the layers of paint, mainly using brown, orange, yellow, white and a bit of black for the nostrils. I then mixed up a light green for the background.

 

I ran out of time to paint the one that was at the modroc stage, so that can save for when I do another demonstration.

IMG_3769

If you are one of the people that have one of my “Make Your Own 3D Picture Highland Cow Kits” then hopefully you have found this helpful when you come to paint yours.

If you do need any help email me at info@purplefaye.co.uk

I’m going to be posting some more blogs showing how I made the other original 3D acrylic paintingss that my kits are based on. So look out for those.

 

Till next time.

Take care.

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

 

 

Making of the African Elephant 3D Acrylic Painting by artist Purple Faye

Here’s the step by step photos of how I made my 3D acrylic painting of an African Elephant.

I started by drawing it out on the cardboard, then cutting it out and laying it up to make it 3D. I then put the modroc on, using it to create the wrinkled texture. Once it had dried I then started painting it with acrylic paints. I started by painting the shadows so I could map out where they were going to be, I then painted over it all with a mid tone grey, the black was still slightly visible through the grey. It was then a case of painting in all the tones and details until I finally painted the background in a light peachy colour to compliment the warm grey tones of the elephant.

I painted this while I was in my pop up shop in Castleford in 2013, you can read more about my time there in the blog post I wrote about it here.

It was the first time I’d attempted doing anything like this on this scale and I was pleased with how it turned out. I’m still really proud of it which is why I use it on my promo material, leaflets, business cards, etc, as a way to show the process I use to make my 3D acrylic paintings.

 

Till next time,

Take care.

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

Making of the “Mallard No. 4468” 3D Acrylic Painting

Here’s how I made the “Mallard No. 4468” 3D Acrylic Painting.

See the video on youtube here (https://youtu.be/DT0qga25ork)

A bit about the Mallard No. 4468 :

A London and North Eastern Railway Class A4 4-6-2 Pacific steam locomotive built at Doncaster, England in 1938. It is historically significant as the holder of the world speed record for steam locomotives.

The A4 class was designed by Sir Nigel Gresley to power high-speed streamlined trains. The wind-tunnel-tested, aerodynamic body and high power allowed the class to reach speeds of over 100 miles per hour (160 km/h), although in everyday service it rarely attained this speed. No regular steam-hauled rail service in the UK reached even 90 mph, much less 100. Mallard covered almost one and a half million miles (2.4 million km) before it was retired in 1963.

It was restored to working order in the 1980s, but has not operated since, apart from hauling some specials between York and Scarborough in July 1986 and a couple of runs between York and Harrogate/Leeds around Easter 1987. Mallard is now part of the National Collection at the United Kingdom’s National Railway Museum in York. On the weekend of 5 July 2008, Mallard was taken outside for the first time in years and displayed beside the three other A4s that are resident in the UK, thus reuniting them for the first time since preservation. It departed the museum for Locomotion, the NRM’s outbase at Shildon on 23 June 2010, where it was a static exhibit, until it was hauled back to York on 19 July 2011 and put back on display in its original location in the Great Hall.

The locomotive is 70 ft (21 m) long and weighs 165 tons, including the tender. It is painted LNER garter blue with red wheels and steel rims.” – taken from wikipedia.org

 

I always like to get feedback so please leave a comment or email info@purplefaye.co.uk

Till next time

Take care

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

How I made the “Spitfire MK VB” 3D Acrylic Painting

Here’s how I made the “Spitfire MK VB” 3D Acrylic Painting…..

A bit about the Spitfire:

“The Supermarine Spitfire is a British single-seat fighter aircraft that was used by the Royal Air Force and many other Allied countries before, during and after the Second World War. The Spitfire was built in many variants, using several wing configurations, and was produced in greater numbers than any other British aircraft. It was also the only British fighter to be in continuous production throughout the war. The Spitfire continues to be popular among enthusiasts, with approximately 53 Spitfires being airworthy, while many more are static exhibits in aviation museums throughout the world.

The Spitfire was designed as a short-range, high-performance interceptor aircraft by R. J. Mitchell, chief designer at Supermarine Aviation Works, which operated as a subsidiary of Vickers-Armstrong from 1928. In accordance with its role as an interceptor, Mitchell supported the development of the Spitfire’s distinctive elliptical wing (designed by B. Shenstone) to have the thinnest possible cross-section; this enabled the Spitfire to have a higher top speed than several contemporary fighters, including the Hawker Hurricane. Mitchell continued to refine the design until his death in 1937, whereupon his colleague Joseph Smith took over as chief designer, overseeing the development of the Spitfire through its multitude of variants.

During the Battle of Britain, from July to October 1940, the Spitfire was perceived by the public to be the RAF fighter, though the more numerous Hawker Hurricane shouldered a greater proportion of the burden against the Nazi German air force, the Luftwaffe. Spitfire units, however, had a lower attrition rate and a higher victory-to-loss ratio than those flying Hurricanes because of its higher performance. Spitfires in general were tasked with engaging the Luftwaffe fighters (mainly Messerschmitt Bf 109E series aircraft which were a close match for the Spitfire) during the Battle.

After the Battle of Britain, the Spitfire superseded the Hurricane to become the backbone of RAF Fighter Command, and saw action in the European, Mediterranean, Pacific and the South-East Asian theatres. Much loved by its pilots, the Spitfire served in several roles, including interceptor, photo-reconnaissance, fighter-bomber and trainer, and it continued to serve in these roles until the 1950s. The Seafire was a carrier-based adaptation of the Spitfire which served in the Fleet Air Arm from 1942 through to the mid-1950s. Although the original airframe was designed to be powered by a Rolls-Royce Merlin engine producing 1,030 hp (768 kW), it was strong enough and adaptable enough to use increasingly powerful Merlins and, in later marks, Rolls-Royce Griffon engines producing up to 2,340 hp (1,745 kW); as a consequence of this the Spitfire’s performance and capabilities improved over the course of its life.” taken from en.wikipedia.org

“The VB became the main production version of the Mark Vs. Along with the new Merlin 45 series the B wing was fitted as standard. As production progressed changes were incorporated, some of which became standard on all later Spitfires. Production started with several Mk IBs which were converted to Mk VBs by Supermarine. Starting in early 1941 the round section exhaust stacks were changed to a “fishtail” type, marginally increasing exhaust thrust. Some late production VBs and VCs were fitted with six shorter exhaust stacks per side, similar to those of Spitfire IXs and Seafire IIIs; this was originally stipulated as applying specifically to VB(trop)s.[82] After some initial problems with the original Mk I size oil coolers, a bigger oil cooler was fitted under the port wing; this could be recognised by a deeper housing with a circular entry. From mid-1941 alloy covered ailerons became a universal fitting.” taken from en.wikipedia.org

 

If you have any further questions about how I made it then please feel free to ask or just let me know what you think about it,

comment below or email info@purplefaye.co.uk

 

Till next time,

Take care

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk