Artist Purple Faye Moving back into Pontefract Studio

If you missed my newsletter earlier this this month then you may have missed my exciting news. ( You can sign up to get my monthly newsletter here)

I’m pleased to say that I’m going to be moving back into the first floor office space in Pearl Assurance House in Pontefract (above the Wetherspoons). I’m hoping to be moving in at the beginning of October and then I’ll be able to stay on a month by month basis as the space is still on the market so I get a month’s notice when I need to move out.

Fingers crossed I’ll be able to stay there until Christmas at least but we’ll just have to wait and see.

This will be the 3rd time I’ve been able to use this space, the first time I was in one of the smaller rooms (which you can read about here) and the second time I was able to use the big room but unfortunately I was only there for a few months (which you can read about here).

Both times I just used the space as a studio that people were able to come visit when I held open days or if they made an appointment. I also did workshops there too which were again by appointment only.

This time however I’m wanting to use the space more like the time when I had the use of an empty shop in Castleford (which you can read about here) but on a bigger scale with lots of other artists and makers work on display there for sale too alongside mine.

I’ll still use it as a studio to make new work and to display my work in, so people can pop in to see what I’m working on and how I make my 3D acrylic paintings, they can also commission me to make them their very own 3D acrylic painting and to do workshops with me to make their own 3D pictures.

The plan is for it to be more like a gallery/arts and crafts shop open to the public so they can buy directly from me and all the other artists/makers work that will be there too, I’m also hoping to put on some special one off events and offers in the run up to Christmas (if I’m still able to use the space then) to try and encourage footfall. As it’s on the first floor and there aren’t any ramps or lifts it isn’t ideal for accessability so I’m going to try and do my best to overcome these somehow.

At the moment (Thursday 19th September 2019) I’m waiting to get the keys and start moving in. Then I can contact artists/makers to invite them to join me.

If you are (and/or know) an artist/maker that would like to have your work on display for sale in this space then please get in touch purplefaye.co.uk/contact  (all arts and crafts are welcome).

 

(These photos are from when I was there last time)

I’ll let you know once I get the keys and all systems are go.

 

 

Till next time.

Take care.

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

 

*EDIT*

Sadly this fell through after some issues with getting the keys and then being told that the landlord had sold the property to someone else again.

Making of Douglas and Oxo 3D acrylic painting doggy portraits by artist Purple Faye

A couple of years ago, when I was in the Artworld 2 Gallery in Wakefield, I got a commission to make 2 small 3D acrylic paintings of doggies called Douglas and Oxo. The lady who commissioned them chose the background colours she wanted plus as an extra request she wanted the names painted on the canvas too.

I took these pictures as I was making them to show the process of how they were progressing. I started by drawing each one on cardboard, working from the photos she had sent to my phone. I then cut out the cardboard and sculpted it into layers to make the drawings 3D. Next I put modroc on to add texture and provide a solid base so then I could paint them with acrylic paints.

When she came to collect them from me at the gallery she was delighted with them. If you would like me to make a 3D acrylic painting of your dog or anything else then email info@purplefaye.co.uk

Till next time,

Take care.

Purple Faye

purplefaye.co.uk

Purple Faye Art Adventure: Disobedient Bodies JW Anderson curates The Hepworth Wakefield

On Saturday (8th April 2017) after visiting the Spring Market and other exhibitions at The Hepworth Wakefield I finally went to see the Disobedient Bodies exhibition. it’s something that I’d been wanting to go see since opening night but hadn’t been able to yet. I’d seen quite a bit on social media from people who went to opening night, plus I follow The Hepworth Wakefield on Instagram etc too, which had given me an idea of what is was going to be like. But even in these pics that I’ve taken trying to give an overall impression of what it’s like to experience it as an exhibition as a whole, rather than just individual pieces, I still don’t think they convey get quite how intimate yet vast the whole thing feels to be there.

When I walked in I was immediately impressed and enjoyed the way JW Anderson had used fabric to section off the space. This meant that you were teased with glimpses of what was beyond in the next space while alson taking in what was there in the space with you. It’s not something I’d seen used before and personally I think it worked well.

I also liked spotting the quotes on the floor too.

The items don’t have information alongside them, telling you what it’s called, who made it etc, instead there’s a directory booklet at the extrance that you pick up which has all the information in instead.

It made me feel like I was playing a game of treasure hunt, or spot the artwork, going round looking in the directory spotting each piece and figuring out which one it was, there were numbers to help identify them though. But I still went round the exhibtion twice. Once without the directory where I took the pics and enjoyed just looking at everything without knowing much about it.

I then went to one of the seating areas looking out towards the Chantry Chapel and went through the directory, taking pics of each page (which I’ve included below with the rest of the pics) before going round again. As much as I do like knowing the information behind the piece I did like the cleaness of not having the information next to everything cluttering the space up, so I think the directory booklet was a good idea.

As you can probably tell I really enjoyed this exhibition, it’s on until the 8th of June so if you do get chance to go then I recommend that you do. More info at the end.

Disobedient Bodies: JW Anderson Curates The Hepworth Wakefield

18 March – 18 June 2017

This major exhibition sees Jonathan Anderson, one of the world’s most innovative contemporary fashion designers, exploring the human form in art, fashion and design.

A personal selection of sculptures are on display, alongside notable fashion pieces and objects of craft and design, investigating the way the human form has been reconceived by artists and designers across the 20th and 21st centuries.

The selection is shaped by Anderson’s long-standing passion for modern art (from the mid-20th century) and the underlying questions of gender that have been posed by his own fashion collections at JW Anderson

Figurative sculptures by artists including Jean Arp, Louise Bourgeois, Lynn Chadwick, Naum Gabo, Barbara Hepworth, Sarah Lucas, Henry Moore, Magali Reus and Dorothea Tanning are in direct dialogue with fashion pieces by designers such as Christian Dior, Jean Paul Gaultier, Rei Kawakubo of Commes des Garçons, Helmut Lang and Issey Miyake.

The exhibition also features a new series of photographs by Jamie Hawkesworth who Dazed describe as ‘one of the most visionary fashion photographers working today’. Hawkesworth worked in the gallery with 123 Yorkshire school children wearing fashion pieces by designers including Issy Miyake and Vivienne Westwood. Find out more

Anderson has collaborated with Tom Emerson and Stephanie Macdonald of 6a architects to present this exhibition, which unfolds across the galleries, offering a series of contrasting experiences for you to explore.

MORE ABOUT  JW ANDERSON

Jonathan Anderson was born in Northern Ireland in 1984 and studied menswear at the London College of Fashion. He established his label JW Anderson in 2008 with a menswear collection. In 2010 he launched a capsule collection for women, quickly achieving critical acclaim and commercial success.

JW Anderson is regarded as one of London’s most forward thinking brands, with a unique design aesthetic that offers a modern interpretation of masculinity and femininity. In 2013 investment by LVMH Moet Hennessy further cemented JW Anderson’s status as a rising, new generation brand. In the same year Jonathan was appointed Creative Director of Loewe and works on both brands in tandem.

JW Anderson has evolved into an internationally renowned and award-winning brand. Awards include British  Fashion Award for ‘Emerging Talent, Ready-to-Wear’ (2012), ‘The New Establishment Award’ (2013) and ‘Menswear Designer of the Year’ (2014). He was also the first designer to win both womenswear and menswear designer in the same year at the British Fashion Awards (2015).  

The Hepworth Wakefield
Gallery Walk
Wakefield, West Yorkshire
WF1 5AW

OPENING HOURS, FREE ADMISSION

Tuesday – Sunday, 10am – 5pm
Closed Mondays, except local school holidays and bank holiday Monday

 

Till next time,

Take care.

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

Purple Faye Art Adventure: The Hepworth Wakefield April 8th 2017

Last Saturday (8th April 2017) after I’d visited The Hepworth Wakefield Spring Market, in The Calder building, I popped over to the main building to look round. I was looking forward to seeing the Disobedient Bodies exhibition but I’m going to write about that in a separate blog post, I don’t want the other exhibitions to get overshadowed and lost by putting them all together, there’s some really great work in them (as you will see in the pics I took) and it’s be a shame to overlook them

It really is worth making the trip to see them for yourself if you can but if you can’t then hopefully this will give you a bit of a taster. I tried to take shots that would give a sense of seeing how the pieces work together as a whole exhibition rather than focusing on individual pieces,  I did focus more on the things I liked most though. I also tried to take pics of the information written on the wall to explain what each exhibition is about but I’ll also include excerps from The Hepworth website at the end to help provide more detail too.

You’ll also see some shots taken from the windows in the gallery spaces too, many including the Chantry Chapel where I exhibited some of my work in last May’s Artwalk, read about it here.

-Additional Infomation-

Anthea Hamilton Reimagines Kettle’s Yard 15 September 2016 – 1 May 2017

The Hepworth Wakefield and Kettle’s Yard, Cambridge are delighted to present a new installation by 2016 Turner Prize nominee, Anthea Hamilton, an artist renowned for her art-pop, culture-inspired sculptures and installations that incorporate references from the worlds of art, fashion, design and cinema.

Hamilton has reinstalled our exhibition Kettle’s Yard at The Hepworth Wakefield which has been on display since May 2016, while Kettle’s Yard is closed for renovation.  

Based on her research into the art and objects of the Kettle’s Yard collection, Hamilton has re-appropriated objects from the collection, using unexpected details as starting points for new works. 

Significantly, Hamilton has also invited several British and international artists, with whom she has either previously worked, or whose work is important to her, to contribute to this exhibition. These include: French artist Laëtitia Badaut Haussmann, British artist Nicholas Byrne, British photographer Roger Philips, German artist Daniel Sinsel, Latvian artist Ella Kruglyanskaya, Polish artist Maria Loboda and the celebrated American photographer Robert Mapplethorpe. 

György Gordon: From Hungary to Yorkshire, 1924-2005 Opens Sat 25 February

The Hungarian-born artist György Gordon became a refugee after fleeing the Hungarian Uprising of 1956. He resettled in Wakefield in 1964 where he became a lecturer in Graphic Design and the leader of the painting department at Wakefield College of Art.

A gifted teacher, he inspired admiration and affection from generations of young artists. This new exhibition celebrates the recent gift of three paintings to the Wakefield collection.

Approximately 30 works, comprising paintings, works on paper and archival material are on display, including the three gifted works exploring themes of solitude and displacement.

A Contemporary Collection

24 September 2016 – Autumn 2017

The Wakefield Permanent Art Collection was founded in 1923, and housed in Wakefield Art Gallery from 1932. Shortly after, Wakefield Councilman Alfred Carr stated that the purpose of the collection was ‘to keep in touch with modern art, in its relations to modern life’. In its first decades, the collection acquired works of art by important British artists of the early twentieth century who had championed art as a reflection of contemporary experience. These included critic and painter Roger Fry and artists of the Camden Town Group who celebrated ordinary people and everyday events.

The collection supported emerging local artists Barbara Hepworth and Henry Moore, acquiring their work early in their careers along with that of painter Ben Nicholson. Nicholson and Hepworth, who married in 1938, had formed a new avant-garde in the 1930s that fused geometric abstraction and utopian ideals, which they took to St. Ives during World War II. Paintings created in response to the devastation of the war were acquired by Wakefield through the War Artists Advisory Committee in the late 1940s, providing local audiences with a reflection of the hardships they and their fellow countrymen faced.

In post-war Britain, Wakefield continued to host exhibitions of contemporary artists and collect their works. Alan Davie had his first solo exhibition at Wakefield Art Gallery in 1958 under the directorship of Helen Kapp, and a number of his paintings were subsequently acquired. Gifts have played an important part in the development of the collection. As the new building of The Hepworth Wakefield was in development, Sir Alan Bowness, Barbara Hepworth’s son-in-law, donated a group of paintings through
the Art Fund. These included works by Davie and significant abstract artists of the 1960s and 70s such as John Golding and John Hoyland.

Since opening in 2011, The Hepworth Wakefield has continued Wakefield’s tradition of supporting contemporary artists through exhibitions and acquisitions. Its inaugural exhibition was of new work by Eva Rothschild, whose sculpture Wandering Palm was subsequently acquired. Some artists who have exhibited at the gallery have generously given works to the collection, such as Matt Darbyshire’s Untitled (Shelf), which allows the collection to remain contemporary. One of the most recent acquisitions, Anthea Hamilton’s Leg Chair, was acquired through the Contemporary Art Society in 2015, and marks Hamilton’s current exhibition in Gallery 3.

NEW FOR 2017

A Contemporary Collection includes a section curated by Art & Social, a group of young people who meet every Friday at The Hepworth Wakefield to be creative, build skills and develop friendships and confidence. They have selected works from the collection, which are presented alongside collectively written poems that give an insight into their choices.

The Hepworth Family Gift/Hepworth at Work

On Permanent Display at The Hepworth Wakefield

The Hepworth Family Gift consists of 44 full size, rarely seen working models – surviving prototypes in plaster and aluminium made in preparation for the works in bronze Hepworth executed from the mid-1950s to the end of her career. It also includes drawings and a large group of lithographs and screen prints by Barbara Hepworth, and has been given to The Hepworth Wakefield, via the Art Fund, by the artist’s daughters Rachel Kidd and Sarah Bowness, through the Trustees of the Barbara Hepworth Estate.

The Hepworth at Work display explores Hepworth’s studio environment, her work in plaster, her collaborative relationships with bronze foundries and the monumental commissions she received in the last fifteen years of her life. The tools and materials on display were Hepworth’s own and have been drawn from her second studio in St Ives, the Palais de Danse. Also featured is a step-by-step reconstruction of the bronze-casting process, photographs of works in progress and four specially commissioned films containing archival footage of the artist in her studio.

The gallery introduces The Hepworth Family Gift, a unique collection of Hepworth’s working models that is on permanent display at The Hepworth Wakefield. Representing the first stage of the creative process, they offer an invaluable insight into her art and, in particular, her approach to working with plaster.

The collection reflects the variety of ways in which Hepworth used plaster and aluminium. She preferred to make prototypes on the same scale as the finished sculptures and would have worked directly on the majority of these models.

The centrepiece of the Gift is the aluminium prototype for Winged Figure, 1961 – 3, the sculpture commissioned by John Lewis Partnership for their flagship store on Oxford Street, London. At nearly six metres high, this is the only working model to survive for the monumental commissions Hepworth received in later life.

 

 

Till next time,

Take care.

Purple Faye

purplefaye.co.uk

Visit to The Great Yorkshire Show 2016

On Thursday the 14th July 2016 I went to visit The Great Yorkshire Show, it’s something I’ve been doing for the past few year now. (Read the blog post from my visit last year here)

The Great Yorkshire Show is England’s largest agricultural show. It’s held in Harrogate at the specially dedicated Great Yorkshire Showground. The first show was in 1837 and it’s been on every year since then on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday at the beginning of July (usually the second week).

This year I went specifically to visit the Art demonstrations, gallery and arts/crafts stalls. I was still planning on seeing some animals and things too but my main focus was the arty stuff.

In previous years I just tended to wander round looking at the animals and watching any random demonstrations that were on if I happened to be there at the right time. But last year Lucy Fiona Morrison (lucyfionamorrison.co.uk) (who I know through The Art House in Wakefield) did an art demonstration on the Wednesday. Unfortunately I wasn’t able to go on the Wednesday but when I went on the Thursday I had a quick look to see what other art demos were on and was suprised to fnd out how much arty stuff was at the agricultural show.

This year Lucy did her demo on Wednesday again, so I missed it again sadly. However I did get to see  Mandy Long (mandylong.com) show how she makes her wonderful ceramic sculptures, I then popped over to see the chickens. At one point I looked into get my own chickens but was told by the council that I wasn’t allowed to have them, so I got my 3 kitties instead.

The next art demo of the day was by Julie Cross  who showed how she makes her animal oil paintings and the last one was Richard Keeton showing his sea birds sketching techniques. Some of their work was in the gallery along with the wire sculptures of Chris Moss and stained glass of Caryl Hallett and much more.

Also around the showground are tents dedicated to stalls for arts and crafts, and this year the new hall was finished which had even more room for arts, crafts and food stalls, so I had plenty to keep me busy. Plus as it was the last day a lot of the food stalls and things which had been entered for competitions (cheese, flowers etc) were being sold off at the end of the day so I treated my mum to some flowers again.

 

I really enjoyed my day out at The Great Yorkshire Show, the time seemed to fly by and I felt very inspired by all the artists and artwork I saw.

I’m looking forward to going again next year.

 

Take care,

Till next time

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

Purple Faye Online Shop on Folksy

You can now buy a select range of Purple Faye products from the Purple Faye shop on Folksy:

folksy.com/shops/purplefaye

Click the link above or you can go on purplefaye.co.uk and click on the shop tab

Products include ready made 3D Acrylic Paintings, Kits to make your own 3D Picture and a range of sizes so you  can order your own bespoke 3D Acrylic Painting to be made for you by Purple Faye.

About Folksy

Folksy is a place to buy and sell hand crafted or designed work from UK designer-makers based on the edge of the beautiful Peak District national park in Sheffield, UK.

Why do we ‘do’ Folksy? We mainly do it because we believe in:

  1. Craft skills. We love craft and design skills, the process by which people use their creativity and talent to make beautiful work. Most of all, we love making.
  2. Strength in numbers. Professional, portfolio and hobbyist designer-makers can reach a mainstream audience, test markets and grow their business more effectively on Folksy rather than through costly galleries and boutique shops.
  3. Cottage industries. Small scale production and handmade goods offer ways to be creative, manage resources effectively and support local economies.
  4. Meritocracy. Any designer-maker can list their work as long as it is hand crafted (no vintage or mass manufactured work is allowed). This creates a meritocracy where great work from hobbyists can rub shoulders with the best from established professional crafters. The work should stand for itself.
  5. David not Goliath. 🙂

Folksy is run by James Boardwell and has been since it started in 2008. The inspiration for Folksy came from seeing the energy in the craft communities in the UK as well as North America and Australia in the early 2000s. At the same time the web was offering ways to crowd source solutions to problems and James, having worked in researching and designing digital services for the BBC decided to build a great place for people to showcase and sell their craft work.

Folksy launched in summer 2008, employed its first member of staff in 2009 and has since risen to become the most popular UK site for independently crafted and designed gifts and supplies with over £1 million in sales and a community of 13,000 or so designer makers and a bazillion* buyers.

(*OK, not a bazillion – how much is a bazillion anyway? – but a lot). Find out more here

 

Free Listings Weekend

This bank holiday weekend Folksy are offering 20 free listings, plus you get 3 free when you first set up a store with them too, so that is why I now have 23 things in my Folksy shop.

We’ll see how it goes, I may add more things to it or try somewhere else. Where do you use and recommend?

 

A selection of my work is still in The Picture Box Gallery in Wakefield available to buy:

14 Northgate, Wakefield, WF1 3AA

Open Mon-Sat

9am-5pm

You can still buy from me directly too, just email me at info@purplefaye.co.uk

If you are local and wish to buy and collect from me at my Pontefract studio (save on the costly postage prices) just let me know so we can arrange it.

 

Which way do you prefer to buy from me?

  1. Order by Email
  2. In Person (from Pontefract Studio)
  3. Online Store
  4. From the Wakefield Gallery
  5. Some other way

I really appreciate any feedback you can give me about this.

 

Enjoy the rest of the bank holiday weekend,

Take Care,

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

info@purplefaye.co.uk

My Old Shop – Purple Faye in Castleford

From the end of October 2012 to the end of March 2014 I had the use of 31 Albion Street, Castleford (next to the bus station) as part of The Art House in Wakefield “Sites in Sight: Art for the Quiet Times” initiative. While I was there I used the space as a studio to make my 3D Acrylic Paintings as well as a gallery to show them to the public. I also offered the chance to try the technique in workshops with me and with kits that could be taken away to use at home.

I’ve been trying to find another shop space to continue what I started in Castleford, so far I’ve not been able to but I’ve managed to get some studio space in an old office building in Pontefract to use in a similar way. I’ll tell you more about that in another blog post here.

 

Till next time

Take care

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk