Pontefract Artist Purple Faye at Wakefield Westgate Studios: Demo and Artwalk

On Tuesday 25th July 2017 I performed a demonstration of how I make my 3D acrylic paintings for Wakefield Art Club. Lasting for 2 hours, from 7pm-9pm with a 15min tea break interval half way through, I started by showing them the process of drawing the design on the cardboard, then cutting it out and layering it to make it 3D. Next I showed them how I use modroc to cover the cardboard and create texture. I was making a Highland cow so I could show several techniques of manipulating the modroc to make different textures. The modroc needed more than 15mins to dry in the interval so I’d fetched along one that I’d prepared earlier so I could show them the next stage of painting it with acrylic paint.

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I really enjoyed it, and I had lots of nice comments saying that the audience enjoyed it too. so if anyone else would like me to come to your art club etc to show how I make my 3D acrylic paintings then please get in touch.

info @purplefaye.co.uk

I can also do workshops too so you can try it for yourself.

When I arrived at Wakefield Westgate Studios, where the demonstration was taking place, I was let in by the owner Carl Hardwick. He told me that there was an empty studio available for the Artwalk taking place the next day if I wanted to use it.

Even though it was a bit late notice, less than a day away, I had fetched quite a lot of my work to show at the demonstration  so I could leave it in the studio overnight. This was really helpful and meant I had less things to fetch and carry the next day.

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Wakefield Artwalk takes place every other month, January March May July September November, on the last Wednesday of that month. Lots of different venues are involved, but not all the venues take place in every one, showing a variety of different art exhibitions, open studios, talks and much more. You can see previous Artwalk outings in my blog posts about them here, here and here or type artwalk into the search bar.

I was pleased with how I got the studio looking in a short space of time and I had lots of nice comments from the visitors that came in. I even had a couple of enquiries about workshops and demonstrations and was able to do some more research into what templates people would like to see for my make your own 3D picture kits too.

So overall a productive and successful couple of days.

Let me know in the comments below what you would like me to make a template of so you can make your own 3D picture.

I look forward to seeing what you put.

 

Till next time,

Take care.

Purple Faye x

info@purplefaye.co.uk

purplefaye.co.uk

Pontefract Artist Purple Faye at Holmfirth Artweek 2nd-8th July 2017

Starting at 10am on Sunday 2nd July and finishing at 5pm on Saturday the 8th of July in Holmfirth Civic Hall, the main exhibition, Holmfirth Artweek is one of the UK’s largest open art exhibitions. This year was my third year taking part, you can read about the preparation for it and my first and second years there in previous blog posts here, here and here.

This year I had two of my 3D acrylic paintings in the main exhibition and it was the first year that I put some of my cards and framed prints in the market too.

On the Thursday and Friday, 6th and 7th July 2017, I took part in the artist demonstrations. I’d done these in previous years too, the first year was just an afternoon and last year was for one day, so I had some idea of what to expect and was looking forward to them. I was looking forward to seeing the other artists demonstrations as much as I was looking forward to doing my own.

I’d decided that on the first day I would do the cardboard and modroc stages then leave them to dry overnight and paint them on the second day.

I’ll show more in depth work in progress shots of each of them and explain more about them too in seperate blog posts. This is just a brief overview so you can get an idea of what I got up to.

On the second day I had to have a bit of a shuffle about to make room for the artist who was going next to me.

I was also able to have some of my cards and framed prints on another table in the demo area too, just across from where I was so I could keep an eye on it.

Both the days passed really quickly and it wasn’t long until I was back on Saturday afternoon to collect anything that hadn’t sold. Sadly that was everything, but I’d still enjoyed it and have already been told that I can demo there on the Friday and Saturday next year so I’ll see you there!

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Holmfirth Artweek is run by volunteers so I’d like to say a big thank you to them all for all their hard work in making it run as smoothly as it did.

Find out more on holmfirthartweek.org.uk

 

Any questions?

Just ask in the comments below.

 

Till next time,

take care.

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

 

Purple Faye Art adventure: Wakefield Artwalk 31st May 2017

Yesterday evening it was the Wakefield Artwalk again.

“Every other month, venues across Wakefield come alive with a variety of visual arts and crafts, live music, and performances”

As I missed the one in March, because I went to Amsterdam which you can read about in the blog post I wrote about it , I was looking forward to seeing what people were up to this time. I wasn’t disappointed, there was plenty to see and I had lots of inspiring chats with all the lovely people I met on the way. Even though I was trying to get round to see as much as I could at the same time too.

I started at the Chantry Chapel where I saw the colourful abstract work of Terence Fletcher and had a little chat with Brian Holding, I’d had my own exhibition there in last year’s May Artwalk which you can read about in my blog post here.  I then went over to The Hepworth. I don’t normally go to The Hepworth as part of the Artwalk because I can go there at other times and most of the other things on the artwalk are only open for the Artwalk so I go to see them while I can instead. But this time there was a curator talk on at 6pm, plus since I was last there, which you can read about here, they’ve got new Barbara Hepworth and Henry Moore exhibitions on so I wanted to go see them too. And since it’s only over the road from the Chantry Chapel it was easy enough for me to go to.

The curator talk about the Gyorgy Gorgon work was really interesting and I really enjoyed going round The Hepworth when there was hardly anyone else there. Even though I’ve visited the Disobedient Bodies exhibition before, read about that here, I enjoyed it even more when there was no one else there. I kept seeing things that I didn’t remember seeing before, which could have just been my poor memory or that there weren’t people getting in the way this time. Either way I enjoyed it, so even if you’ve already been to see the exhibition I can recommend going to see it a second time, but you only have until the 18th June (Father’s day) to go to see it, so not long left.

Next I went into town to Wakefield Cathedral to see the Jacqui Parkinson: Good Grief! series of antique handkerchiefs stitched by the artist as an outpouring of grief exhibition. While I was there I was treated to a spinning wheel demonstration by the lovely Tracey too.

From there I walked round the corner following the signs to The Cathedral Centre to see the ‘Home’ exhibition of traditional and digital drawings by local artist Cameron Hopkins.

Next stop was Jordans Solicitors on King Street to see the Evinced works by Lora Caselli.

After that I went up to SNAP Arts (near the college) to see Louise Barrett: Wastelands solo exhibition of new works.

I wanted to see the Ella Holland Wall Mural again, it’s outside the Wakefield One building. She did it in October last year as part of her residency at The Art House, so on previous Artwalks it’s been dark when I’ve seen it. It was nice to see it in the daylight, even if someone has added their own contribution to it now too. You can see some pics of it in different lighting in the blog post I wrote about the January Artwalk.

I decided that I’d go down (the hill) to the Neon Workshops next to see the new neon and mixed media work by Richard William Wheater, then come back up to do the rest as I didn’t want to miss it by running out of time.

I then went to the Theatre Royal Wakefield and was really impressed with the Melanie England ‘Sparkle Thief’ Memories installation of upcycled hand made wreaths, giving new life to day to day items from the past. My favourite three were the ones with liquorice allsorts, painted toy soldiers and cotton reels.

Lastly I went to Unity Works to see Ronald Jackson’s ‘The Art of Rugby League’ exhibition, plus the paintings on slate of Jill Green and some of Lucy Fiona Morrison’s epic landscape paintings.

Then before I knew it it was after 9pm and I was too late to get to anywhere else but I left Wakefield in a great mood, feeling really positive after talking to people and looking forward to telling you all about it so you can go to the next one on the last Wednesday of July (the 26th).

 

Till next time,

Take care.

 

Purple Faye  x

purplefaye.co.uk

Purple Faye Art Adventure: Disobedient Bodies JW Anderson curates The Hepworth Wakefield

On Saturday (8th April 2017) after visiting the Spring Market and other exhibitions at The Hepworth Wakefield I finally went to see the Disobedient Bodies exhibition. it’s something that I’d been wanting to go see since opening night but hadn’t been able to yet. I’d seen quite a bit on social media from people who went to opening night, plus I follow The Hepworth Wakefield on Instagram etc too, which had given me an idea of what is was going to be like. But even in these pics that I’ve taken trying to give an overall impression of what it’s like to experience it as an exhibition as a whole, rather than just individual pieces, I still don’t think they convey get quite how intimate yet vast the whole thing feels to be there.

When I walked in I was immediately impressed and enjoyed the way JW Anderson had used fabric to section off the space. This meant that you were teased with glimpses of what was beyond in the next space while alson taking in what was there in the space with you. It’s not something I’d seen used before and personally I think it worked well.

I also liked spotting the quotes on the floor too.

The items don’t have information alongside them, telling you what it’s called, who made it etc, instead there’s a directory booklet at the extrance that you pick up which has all the information in instead.

It made me feel like I was playing a game of treasure hunt, or spot the artwork, going round looking in the directory spotting each piece and figuring out which one it was, there were numbers to help identify them though. But I still went round the exhibtion twice. Once without the directory where I took the pics and enjoyed just looking at everything without knowing much about it.

I then went to one of the seating areas looking out towards the Chantry Chapel and went through the directory, taking pics of each page (which I’ve included below with the rest of the pics) before going round again. As much as I do like knowing the information behind the piece I did like the cleaness of not having the information next to everything cluttering the space up, so I think the directory booklet was a good idea.

As you can probably tell I really enjoyed this exhibition, it’s on until the 8th of June so if you do get chance to go then I recommend that you do. More info at the end.

Disobedient Bodies: JW Anderson Curates The Hepworth Wakefield

18 March – 18 June 2017

This major exhibition sees Jonathan Anderson, one of the world’s most innovative contemporary fashion designers, exploring the human form in art, fashion and design.

A personal selection of sculptures are on display, alongside notable fashion pieces and objects of craft and design, investigating the way the human form has been reconceived by artists and designers across the 20th and 21st centuries.

The selection is shaped by Anderson’s long-standing passion for modern art (from the mid-20th century) and the underlying questions of gender that have been posed by his own fashion collections at JW Anderson

Figurative sculptures by artists including Jean Arp, Louise Bourgeois, Lynn Chadwick, Naum Gabo, Barbara Hepworth, Sarah Lucas, Henry Moore, Magali Reus and Dorothea Tanning are in direct dialogue with fashion pieces by designers such as Christian Dior, Jean Paul Gaultier, Rei Kawakubo of Commes des Garçons, Helmut Lang and Issey Miyake.

The exhibition also features a new series of photographs by Jamie Hawkesworth who Dazed describe as ‘one of the most visionary fashion photographers working today’. Hawkesworth worked in the gallery with 123 Yorkshire school children wearing fashion pieces by designers including Issy Miyake and Vivienne Westwood. Find out more

Anderson has collaborated with Tom Emerson and Stephanie Macdonald of 6a architects to present this exhibition, which unfolds across the galleries, offering a series of contrasting experiences for you to explore.

MORE ABOUT  JW ANDERSON

Jonathan Anderson was born in Northern Ireland in 1984 and studied menswear at the London College of Fashion. He established his label JW Anderson in 2008 with a menswear collection. In 2010 he launched a capsule collection for women, quickly achieving critical acclaim and commercial success.

JW Anderson is regarded as one of London’s most forward thinking brands, with a unique design aesthetic that offers a modern interpretation of masculinity and femininity. In 2013 investment by LVMH Moet Hennessy further cemented JW Anderson’s status as a rising, new generation brand. In the same year Jonathan was appointed Creative Director of Loewe and works on both brands in tandem.

JW Anderson has evolved into an internationally renowned and award-winning brand. Awards include British  Fashion Award for ‘Emerging Talent, Ready-to-Wear’ (2012), ‘The New Establishment Award’ (2013) and ‘Menswear Designer of the Year’ (2014). He was also the first designer to win both womenswear and menswear designer in the same year at the British Fashion Awards (2015).  

The Hepworth Wakefield
Gallery Walk
Wakefield, West Yorkshire
WF1 5AW

OPENING HOURS, FREE ADMISSION

Tuesday – Sunday, 10am – 5pm
Closed Mondays, except local school holidays and bank holiday Monday

 

Till next time,

Take care.

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

Purple Faye Art Adventure: The Hepworth Wakefield April 8th 2017

Last Saturday (8th April 2017) after I’d visited The Hepworth Wakefield Spring Market, in The Calder building, I popped over to the main building to look round. I was looking forward to seeing the Disobedient Bodies exhibition but I’m going to write about that in a separate blog post, I don’t want the other exhibitions to get overshadowed and lost by putting them all together, there’s some really great work in them (as you will see in the pics I took) and it’s be a shame to overlook them

It really is worth making the trip to see them for yourself if you can but if you can’t then hopefully this will give you a bit of a taster. I tried to take shots that would give a sense of seeing how the pieces work together as a whole exhibition rather than focusing on individual pieces,  I did focus more on the things I liked most though. I also tried to take pics of the information written on the wall to explain what each exhibition is about but I’ll also include excerps from The Hepworth website at the end to help provide more detail too.

You’ll also see some shots taken from the windows in the gallery spaces too, many including the Chantry Chapel where I exhibited some of my work in last May’s Artwalk, read about it here.

-Additional Infomation-

Anthea Hamilton Reimagines Kettle’s Yard 15 September 2016 – 1 May 2017

The Hepworth Wakefield and Kettle’s Yard, Cambridge are delighted to present a new installation by 2016 Turner Prize nominee, Anthea Hamilton, an artist renowned for her art-pop, culture-inspired sculptures and installations that incorporate references from the worlds of art, fashion, design and cinema.

Hamilton has reinstalled our exhibition Kettle’s Yard at The Hepworth Wakefield which has been on display since May 2016, while Kettle’s Yard is closed for renovation.  

Based on her research into the art and objects of the Kettle’s Yard collection, Hamilton has re-appropriated objects from the collection, using unexpected details as starting points for new works. 

Significantly, Hamilton has also invited several British and international artists, with whom she has either previously worked, or whose work is important to her, to contribute to this exhibition. These include: French artist Laëtitia Badaut Haussmann, British artist Nicholas Byrne, British photographer Roger Philips, German artist Daniel Sinsel, Latvian artist Ella Kruglyanskaya, Polish artist Maria Loboda and the celebrated American photographer Robert Mapplethorpe. 

György Gordon: From Hungary to Yorkshire, 1924-2005 Opens Sat 25 February

The Hungarian-born artist György Gordon became a refugee after fleeing the Hungarian Uprising of 1956. He resettled in Wakefield in 1964 where he became a lecturer in Graphic Design and the leader of the painting department at Wakefield College of Art.

A gifted teacher, he inspired admiration and affection from generations of young artists. This new exhibition celebrates the recent gift of three paintings to the Wakefield collection.

Approximately 30 works, comprising paintings, works on paper and archival material are on display, including the three gifted works exploring themes of solitude and displacement.

A Contemporary Collection

24 September 2016 – Autumn 2017

The Wakefield Permanent Art Collection was founded in 1923, and housed in Wakefield Art Gallery from 1932. Shortly after, Wakefield Councilman Alfred Carr stated that the purpose of the collection was ‘to keep in touch with modern art, in its relations to modern life’. In its first decades, the collection acquired works of art by important British artists of the early twentieth century who had championed art as a reflection of contemporary experience. These included critic and painter Roger Fry and artists of the Camden Town Group who celebrated ordinary people and everyday events.

The collection supported emerging local artists Barbara Hepworth and Henry Moore, acquiring their work early in their careers along with that of painter Ben Nicholson. Nicholson and Hepworth, who married in 1938, had formed a new avant-garde in the 1930s that fused geometric abstraction and utopian ideals, which they took to St. Ives during World War II. Paintings created in response to the devastation of the war were acquired by Wakefield through the War Artists Advisory Committee in the late 1940s, providing local audiences with a reflection of the hardships they and their fellow countrymen faced.

In post-war Britain, Wakefield continued to host exhibitions of contemporary artists and collect their works. Alan Davie had his first solo exhibition at Wakefield Art Gallery in 1958 under the directorship of Helen Kapp, and a number of his paintings were subsequently acquired. Gifts have played an important part in the development of the collection. As the new building of The Hepworth Wakefield was in development, Sir Alan Bowness, Barbara Hepworth’s son-in-law, donated a group of paintings through
the Art Fund. These included works by Davie and significant abstract artists of the 1960s and 70s such as John Golding and John Hoyland.

Since opening in 2011, The Hepworth Wakefield has continued Wakefield’s tradition of supporting contemporary artists through exhibitions and acquisitions. Its inaugural exhibition was of new work by Eva Rothschild, whose sculpture Wandering Palm was subsequently acquired. Some artists who have exhibited at the gallery have generously given works to the collection, such as Matt Darbyshire’s Untitled (Shelf), which allows the collection to remain contemporary. One of the most recent acquisitions, Anthea Hamilton’s Leg Chair, was acquired through the Contemporary Art Society in 2015, and marks Hamilton’s current exhibition in Gallery 3.

NEW FOR 2017

A Contemporary Collection includes a section curated by Art & Social, a group of young people who meet every Friday at The Hepworth Wakefield to be creative, build skills and develop friendships and confidence. They have selected works from the collection, which are presented alongside collectively written poems that give an insight into their choices.

The Hepworth Family Gift/Hepworth at Work

On Permanent Display at The Hepworth Wakefield

The Hepworth Family Gift consists of 44 full size, rarely seen working models – surviving prototypes in plaster and aluminium made in preparation for the works in bronze Hepworth executed from the mid-1950s to the end of her career. It also includes drawings and a large group of lithographs and screen prints by Barbara Hepworth, and has been given to The Hepworth Wakefield, via the Art Fund, by the artist’s daughters Rachel Kidd and Sarah Bowness, through the Trustees of the Barbara Hepworth Estate.

The Hepworth at Work display explores Hepworth’s studio environment, her work in plaster, her collaborative relationships with bronze foundries and the monumental commissions she received in the last fifteen years of her life. The tools and materials on display were Hepworth’s own and have been drawn from her second studio in St Ives, the Palais de Danse. Also featured is a step-by-step reconstruction of the bronze-casting process, photographs of works in progress and four specially commissioned films containing archival footage of the artist in her studio.

The gallery introduces The Hepworth Family Gift, a unique collection of Hepworth’s working models that is on permanent display at The Hepworth Wakefield. Representing the first stage of the creative process, they offer an invaluable insight into her art and, in particular, her approach to working with plaster.

The collection reflects the variety of ways in which Hepworth used plaster and aluminium. She preferred to make prototypes on the same scale as the finished sculptures and would have worked directly on the majority of these models.

The centrepiece of the Gift is the aluminium prototype for Winged Figure, 1961 – 3, the sculpture commissioned by John Lewis Partnership for their flagship store on Oxford Street, London. At nearly six metres high, this is the only working model to survive for the monumental commissions Hepworth received in later life.

 

 

Till next time,

Take care.

Purple Faye

purplefaye.co.uk

Visit to Henry Moore exhibition at Queen’s Mill Castleford 2016

On Friday (21st October 2016) I went to visit the Henry Moore exhibition at The Island Gallery, Queen’s Mill, Castleford.

8th- 29th October, open 10am-4pm Mon-Sat.

“Castleford Heritage Trust and Sandra Worthington present HENRY MOORE AN ARTISTIC LEGACY – A COLLECTION OF HIS SHELTER SKETCHBOOK ILLUSTRATIONS PLUS WORKS BY THE LATE ROBERT GLADE

All items in the exhibition are loaned by their owner Sandra Worthington.

Robert Glade (1926-2015) grew up in the mid-west during America’s Depression and moved to Chicago in the 1950’s to join the beat poets and musicians in ‘the windy city’.  It was in the early 1960’s when Glade met Castleford born Sandra Worthington who was working as a teacher, they moved into an appartment together and in 1966 became engaged.  In 1968 Sandra brought Glade to Europe where they toured the art galleries of capital cities, during this time Glade also visited Castleford where Sandra’s father, a miner, took him crown green bowling in Queen’s Park. From this point on Glade became an arts dealer and collector amassing a great collection of works which included the Henry Moore collotypes. On his death he bequeathed the collotypes to Sandra who has allowed the exhibition to take place.

The works by Moore feature a series of collotypes from his time sheltering from the Blitz in Belsize Park underground railway station.  Moore’s studio in Hampstead was out of action at that time (1940) due to bomb damage, the sketches were subsequently seen by Kenneth Clark, director of the National Gallery who persuaded Moore to become an official war artist.”

For more information on Castleford Heritage Trust and the Queen’s Mill project visit castlefordheritagetrust.org.uk

I think that the mill makes a perfect exhibition space so hopefully there will be more there in the future.

 

Till next time,

Take care

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

 

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Visit to the Pontefract Art Club Exhibition 2016

On Wednesday (19th October 2016) I went to see the Pontefract Art Club exhibition at Pontefract Library. It will be there until October 28th with all the work available for sale. Open times are:

Monday 9:30am – 7pm Shoemarket
Pontefract
WF8 1BD
Main Library:
01977 727 692
Children’s Library:
01977 727 695
Tuesday 9:30am – 5pm
Wednesday 9:30am – 7pm
Thursday Closed
Friday 9:30am – 5pm
Saturday 9:30am – 4pm
Sunday Closed

About Pontefract Art Club

Founded in 1978 it is one of the oldest art clubs in the area. It meets from 7pm-9pm every Wednesday (except August and December) in St Giles Church.

Members range from complete beginners to professionals and come from all areas of the district. New members are always welcome. with the current memebership fee being £20. Every month there are demonstrations by visiting artists which non-members can attend (for a small fee) other evenings include workshops, life drawing, still lifes and critiques, in all mediums. The highlight of the year is the Annual Exhibition where members show their work to the public. -Find out more on their website wdco.org

 

Till next time,

Take care,

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

 

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