Purple Faye Art Adventure: The Hepworth Wakefield April 8th 2017

Last Saturday (8th April 2017) after I’d visited The Hepworth Wakefield Spring Market, in The Calder building, I popped over to the main building to look round. I was looking forward to seeing the Disobedient Bodies exhibition but I’m going to write about that in a separate blog post, I don’t want the other exhibitions to get overshadowed and lost by putting them all together, there’s some really great work in them (as you will see in the pics I took) and it’s be a shame to overlook them

It really is worth making the trip to see them for yourself if you can but if you can’t then hopefully this will give you a bit of a taster. I tried to take shots that would give a sense of seeing how the pieces work together as a whole exhibition rather than focusing on individual pieces,  I did focus more on the things I liked most though. I also tried to take pics of the information written on the wall to explain what each exhibition is about but I’ll also include excerps from The Hepworth website at the end to help provide more detail too.

You’ll also see some shots taken from the windows in the gallery spaces too, many including the Chantry Chapel where I exhibited some of my work in last May’s Artwalk, read about it here.

-Additional Infomation-

Anthea Hamilton Reimagines Kettle’s Yard 15 September 2016 – 1 May 2017

The Hepworth Wakefield and Kettle’s Yard, Cambridge are delighted to present a new installation by 2016 Turner Prize nominee, Anthea Hamilton, an artist renowned for her art-pop, culture-inspired sculptures and installations that incorporate references from the worlds of art, fashion, design and cinema.

Hamilton has reinstalled our exhibition Kettle’s Yard at The Hepworth Wakefield which has been on display since May 2016, while Kettle’s Yard is closed for renovation.  

Based on her research into the art and objects of the Kettle’s Yard collection, Hamilton has re-appropriated objects from the collection, using unexpected details as starting points for new works. 

Significantly, Hamilton has also invited several British and international artists, with whom she has either previously worked, or whose work is important to her, to contribute to this exhibition. These include: French artist Laëtitia Badaut Haussmann, British artist Nicholas Byrne, British photographer Roger Philips, German artist Daniel Sinsel, Latvian artist Ella Kruglyanskaya, Polish artist Maria Loboda and the celebrated American photographer Robert Mapplethorpe. 

György Gordon: From Hungary to Yorkshire, 1924-2005 Opens Sat 25 February

The Hungarian-born artist György Gordon became a refugee after fleeing the Hungarian Uprising of 1956. He resettled in Wakefield in 1964 where he became a lecturer in Graphic Design and the leader of the painting department at Wakefield College of Art.

A gifted teacher, he inspired admiration and affection from generations of young artists. This new exhibition celebrates the recent gift of three paintings to the Wakefield collection.

Approximately 30 works, comprising paintings, works on paper and archival material are on display, including the three gifted works exploring themes of solitude and displacement.

A Contemporary Collection

24 September 2016 – Autumn 2017

The Wakefield Permanent Art Collection was founded in 1923, and housed in Wakefield Art Gallery from 1932. Shortly after, Wakefield Councilman Alfred Carr stated that the purpose of the collection was ‘to keep in touch with modern art, in its relations to modern life’. In its first decades, the collection acquired works of art by important British artists of the early twentieth century who had championed art as a reflection of contemporary experience. These included critic and painter Roger Fry and artists of the Camden Town Group who celebrated ordinary people and everyday events.

The collection supported emerging local artists Barbara Hepworth and Henry Moore, acquiring their work early in their careers along with that of painter Ben Nicholson. Nicholson and Hepworth, who married in 1938, had formed a new avant-garde in the 1930s that fused geometric abstraction and utopian ideals, which they took to St. Ives during World War II. Paintings created in response to the devastation of the war were acquired by Wakefield through the War Artists Advisory Committee in the late 1940s, providing local audiences with a reflection of the hardships they and their fellow countrymen faced.

In post-war Britain, Wakefield continued to host exhibitions of contemporary artists and collect their works. Alan Davie had his first solo exhibition at Wakefield Art Gallery in 1958 under the directorship of Helen Kapp, and a number of his paintings were subsequently acquired. Gifts have played an important part in the development of the collection. As the new building of The Hepworth Wakefield was in development, Sir Alan Bowness, Barbara Hepworth’s son-in-law, donated a group of paintings through
the Art Fund. These included works by Davie and significant abstract artists of the 1960s and 70s such as John Golding and John Hoyland.

Since opening in 2011, The Hepworth Wakefield has continued Wakefield’s tradition of supporting contemporary artists through exhibitions and acquisitions. Its inaugural exhibition was of new work by Eva Rothschild, whose sculpture Wandering Palm was subsequently acquired. Some artists who have exhibited at the gallery have generously given works to the collection, such as Matt Darbyshire’s Untitled (Shelf), which allows the collection to remain contemporary. One of the most recent acquisitions, Anthea Hamilton’s Leg Chair, was acquired through the Contemporary Art Society in 2015, and marks Hamilton’s current exhibition in Gallery 3.

NEW FOR 2017

A Contemporary Collection includes a section curated by Art & Social, a group of young people who meet every Friday at The Hepworth Wakefield to be creative, build skills and develop friendships and confidence. They have selected works from the collection, which are presented alongside collectively written poems that give an insight into their choices.

The Hepworth Family Gift/Hepworth at Work

On Permanent Display at The Hepworth Wakefield

The Hepworth Family Gift consists of 44 full size, rarely seen working models – surviving prototypes in plaster and aluminium made in preparation for the works in bronze Hepworth executed from the mid-1950s to the end of her career. It also includes drawings and a large group of lithographs and screen prints by Barbara Hepworth, and has been given to The Hepworth Wakefield, via the Art Fund, by the artist’s daughters Rachel Kidd and Sarah Bowness, through the Trustees of the Barbara Hepworth Estate.

The Hepworth at Work display explores Hepworth’s studio environment, her work in plaster, her collaborative relationships with bronze foundries and the monumental commissions she received in the last fifteen years of her life. The tools and materials on display were Hepworth’s own and have been drawn from her second studio in St Ives, the Palais de Danse. Also featured is a step-by-step reconstruction of the bronze-casting process, photographs of works in progress and four specially commissioned films containing archival footage of the artist in her studio.

The gallery introduces The Hepworth Family Gift, a unique collection of Hepworth’s working models that is on permanent display at The Hepworth Wakefield. Representing the first stage of the creative process, they offer an invaluable insight into her art and, in particular, her approach to working with plaster.

The collection reflects the variety of ways in which Hepworth used plaster and aluminium. She preferred to make prototypes on the same scale as the finished sculptures and would have worked directly on the majority of these models.

The centrepiece of the Gift is the aluminium prototype for Winged Figure, 1961 – 3, the sculpture commissioned by John Lewis Partnership for their flagship store on Oxford Street, London. At nearly six metres high, this is the only working model to survive for the monumental commissions Hepworth received in later life.

 

 

Till next time,

Take care.

Purple Faye

purplefaye.co.uk

Purple Faye at the Chantry Chapel Wednesday 25th May 2016 for the Wakefield Artwalk

On Wednesday the 25th May 2016 I had an exhibition of my work at the Chantry Chapel in Wakefield as part of the Wakefield Artwalk (5pm-9pm).

I took along my “Ponte Project” and “Trains and Planes” collections, along with a few other things to show the pet portraits I do and what can be made with one of my kits to make your own 3D picture. Unfortunatley the weather was a bit rainy so I was pleased with the turn out we had, about 15 visitors. Plus a few of those signed up to get my newsletter and 3 people bought kits too. (Yay!)

 

 

A bit about Chantry Chapel

“The Chantry Chapel of St Mary the Virgin was built in the mid 14th century when the stone bridge replaced a wooden one. It is one of only three surviving bridge chapels in England and, with the bridge, is a scheduled ancient monument and a Grade I listed building. The original stonework can be seen at the base, although the upper part, including the west front, was rebuilt in 1847-8.
The Friends of Wakefield Chantry Chapel, established in 1990 in collaboration with the Civic Society, exist to ensure the chapel is kept in good repair and is made available to visitors. In 1995 major roof repairs were carried out, and the building was re-wired and new lighting and heating systems were installed. Recently the interior has undergone substantial reordering with the removal of pew platforms, a new stone floor and new seating. The Chantry is now under the authority of the Dean and Chapter of Wakefield Cathedral.
There are open days at public-holiday weekends and group visits can be arranged by appointment at other times.”

Address:
Chantry Chapel of St Mary the Virgin
Chantry Bridge Industrial Estate
Wakefield
West Yorkshire
WF1 5DJ
 
Find out more on the website chantrychapelwakefield.org
(there is a very informative video on there that I enjoyed watching)
Studio Visits
If you would like to see my work in my Pontefract studio then you’re very welcome to, the best way is to get in touch info@purplefaye.co.uk to make an appointment so we can arrange when the best day/time for us both is.
The address is: 1st Floor
Pearl Assurance House
1-3 Horsefair
Pontefract
WF8 1PE
(entrance is via the Fitness Solutions doorway, follow the signs up the stairs for Purple Faye)
I look forward to hearing from you,
Take care
Purple Faye x

Purple Faye 3D Acrylic Paintings at Wakefield Chantry Chapel as part of the Art Walk on Wednesday May 25th

On Wednesday the 25th of May (2016) Purple Faye will have an exhibition of her 3D Acrylic Paintings at the Chantry Chapel in Wakefield (on the bridge near the Hepworth gallery see address further below).

This will be part of the Wakefield ArtWalk and starts at 5pm and finishes at 9pm. (see artwalk.org.uk for further details of venues participating)

It will be your chance to take a look at the “Ponte Project” and “Planes and Trains” collections and talk to the artist. There will also be a selection of other 3D Acrylic Paintings available for sale which you can buy directly from the artist along with being able to commission and order your very own unique 3D Acrylic Painting to be made specially for you.

I really hope you can make it on Wednesday 25th May,

5pm-9pm

Chantry Chapel of St Mary the Virgin
Chantry Bridge Industrial Estate
Wakefield
West Yorkshire
WF1 5DJ
Find out more about Chantry Chapel on the website
4663407_orig
(Photographs by Brian Holding)

Looking forward to seeing you there.

Take care,

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk