Art Adventure: Screen Printing Workshop with Laura Slater at The Art House, Wakefield

On Thursday, 8th June 2017, I managed to get a cancellation booking to do a screen printing workshop with Laura Slater at The Art House in Wakefield. A few days beforehand, I got the cancellation booking on the Monday morning, I received an email explaining that I needed to have my image ready to print. This meant having the master image and then separating it into the different colour layers that were to be printed.

At first I was going to do my screen print of my cute cartoon cat characters so then I could experiment with different colour combinations, but while I was sketching them out my little doggy Jeffrey kept looking at me as if to say “why are you doing cats when you could be doing a picture of me?” So I did a few sketches of him then painted my final master design and made the separate colour layers ready for Thursday morning.

20170607_203943

The first thing we did on the Thursday morning was prepare our screens by applying a light-sensitive emulsion to the surface then leaving it to dry. While it was drying we photocopied each separate layer of our design onto acetate, doubling each layer up to make them even more opaque to stop the light getting through.

20170608_113644

Once the emulsion was dry and the acetates ready we could then use the exposing machine to transfer the designs onto the screens. We did this by putting the acetate, with the design the correct way round, on the glass top of the machine. The screen was then placed emulsion side down on top of the acetate and the rubber lid lowered over them.

Next the vacuum was turned on so the rubber lid formed a tight seal over the screens, stopping any movement that could happen during exposure, then the shutters on the exposure unit were opened so the light could get to the coated screens. These were left open on a preset timer so that they were exposed to the light for the correct amount of time.

After the screens had been exposed we then needed to wash away the areas that had been shielded from the light by the design. This is how the photo process works, the light- sensitive emulsion gets baked onto the screen when it’s exposed to the light. Any areas that weren’t exposed to the light due to the design blocking it out doesn’t get baked. These areas can then be washed off to let the ink through when printing. That’s why it works better to do your design in black to make it as opaque as possible to stop the light getting through.

While the screens were drying, after having the unbaked emulsion washed off, the next job was to mix the inks ready for printing with. I needed a background colour, obviously I went for purple which I made light to contrast with the darkness of the black and grey, then I needed a black and a grey for the body. In my original design I had a black body with grey highlights for the ears and nose. Sadly I had to change this slightly and swap them round as the grey wouldn’t have shown up printed on top of the black, but apart from the eyes I don’t think that it negatively affected it too much.

Once the screens were dry and the ink mixed then we were ready to start printing. As the layers needed to print on top of each other I started by printing my background. I was doing edition printing, this meant that I’d been printing the same thing over and over again so I’d have a set of prints that were all the same. The joy of hand printing means that each one would still be slightly different though.

After the background was printed they were left to dry and I cleaned the ink off the screen. I could then set up ready for the next layer of printing. This meant securing the screen in the hinges that held it in place on the printing board, then lining up the background image to the screen so that it would print in the right place. Using masking tape on the corners of the paper to help register the next one in the same place.

You may remember from the blog post that I wrote a few months ago about my older work, read it here, that when I was studying A level printmaking I always felt that my registration let me down. So it was nice when Laura told me that it’s those things that make hand printing different to being perfectly printed by a machine. The so called mistakes or errors make each one unique even when it’s part of an edition. This made me feel a lot better and more positive towards that older work.

For the last layer of printing I again had to line up the paper with the new screen, using masking tape to help register the rest to the same spot. Also using the acetate print outs to help with this step too. Then it was time to leave them to dry and wash up the screens etc.

I really enjoyed the workshop, it was nice to go back to screen printing after the 15 or so years since I did it at college.

Till next time

Take care

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

Purple Faye Art adventure: Wakefield Artwalk 31st May 2017

Yesterday evening it was the Wakefield Artwalk again.

“Every other month, venues across Wakefield come alive with a variety of visual arts and crafts, live music, and performances”

As I missed the one in March, because I went to Amsterdam which you can read about in the blog post I wrote about it , I was looking forward to seeing what people were up to this time. I wasn’t disappointed, there was plenty to see and I had lots of inspiring chats with all the lovely people I met on the way. Even though I was trying to get round to see as much as I could at the same time too.

I started at the Chantry Chapel where I saw the colourful abstract work of Terence Fletcher and had a little chat with Brian Holding, I’d had my own exhibition there in last year’s May Artwalk which you can read about in my blog post here.  I then went over to The Hepworth. I don’t normally go to The Hepworth as part of the Artwalk because I can go there at other times and most of the other things on the artwalk are only open for the Artwalk so I go to see them while I can instead. But this time there was a curator talk on at 6pm, plus since I was last there, which you can read about here, they’ve got new Barbara Hepworth and Henry Moore exhibitions on so I wanted to go see them too. And since it’s only over the road from the Chantry Chapel it was easy enough for me to go to.

The curator talk about the Gyorgy Gorgon work was really interesting and I really enjoyed going round The Hepworth when there was hardly anyone else there. Even though I’ve visited the Disobedient Bodies exhibition before, read about that here, I enjoyed it even more when there was no one else there. I kept seeing things that I didn’t remember seeing before, which could have just been my poor memory or that there weren’t people getting in the way this time. Either way I enjoyed it, so even if you’ve already been to see the exhibition I can recommend going to see it a second time, but you only have until the 18th June (Father’s day) to go to see it, so not long left.

Next I went into town to Wakefield Cathedral to see the Jacqui Parkinson: Good Grief! series of antique handkerchiefs stitched by the artist as an outpouring of grief exhibition. While I was there I was treated to a spinning wheel demonstration by the lovely Tracey too.

From there I walked round the corner following the signs to The Cathedral Centre to see the ‘Home’ exhibition of traditional and digital drawings by local artist Cameron Hopkins.

Next stop was Jordans Solicitors on King Street to see the Evinced works by Lora Caselli.

After that I went up to SNAP Arts (near the college) to see Louise Barrett: Wastelands solo exhibition of new works.

I wanted to see the Ella Holland Wall Mural again, it’s outside the Wakefield One building. She did it in October last year as part of her residency at The Art House, so on previous Artwalks it’s been dark when I’ve seen it. It was nice to see it in the daylight, even if someone has added their own contribution to it now too. You can see some pics of it in different lighting in the blog post I wrote about the January Artwalk.

I decided that I’d go down (the hill) to the Neon Workshops next to see the new neon and mixed media work by Richard William Wheater, then come back up to do the rest as I didn’t want to miss it by running out of time.

I then went to the Theatre Royal Wakefield and was really impressed with the Melanie England ‘Sparkle Thief’ Memories installation of upcycled hand made wreaths, giving new life to day to day items from the past. My favourite three were the ones with liquorice allsorts, painted toy soldiers and cotton reels.

Lastly I went to Unity Works to see Ronald Jackson’s ‘The Art of Rugby League’ exhibition, plus the paintings on slate of Jill Green and some of Lucy Fiona Morrison’s epic landscape paintings.

Then before I knew it it was after 9pm and I was too late to get to anywhere else but I left Wakefield in a great mood, feeling really positive after talking to people and looking forward to telling you all about it so you can go to the next one on the last Wednesday of July (the 26th).

 

Till next time,

Take care.

 

Purple Faye  x

purplefaye.co.uk

Purple Faye Art Adventure: Disobedient Bodies JW Anderson curates The Hepworth Wakefield

On Saturday (8th April 2017) after visiting the Spring Market and other exhibitions at The Hepworth Wakefield I finally went to see the Disobedient Bodies exhibition. it’s something that I’d been wanting to go see since opening night but hadn’t been able to yet. I’d seen quite a bit on social media from people who went to opening night, plus I follow The Hepworth Wakefield on Instagram etc too, which had given me an idea of what is was going to be like. But even in these pics that I’ve taken trying to give an overall impression of what it’s like to experience it as an exhibition as a whole, rather than just individual pieces, I still don’t think they convey get quite how intimate yet vast the whole thing feels to be there.

When I walked in I was immediately impressed and enjoyed the way JW Anderson had used fabric to section off the space. This meant that you were teased with glimpses of what was beyond in the next space while alson taking in what was there in the space with you. It’s not something I’d seen used before and personally I think it worked well.

I also liked spotting the quotes on the floor too.

The items don’t have information alongside them, telling you what it’s called, who made it etc, instead there’s a directory booklet at the extrance that you pick up which has all the information in instead.

It made me feel like I was playing a game of treasure hunt, or spot the artwork, going round looking in the directory spotting each piece and figuring out which one it was, there were numbers to help identify them though. But I still went round the exhibtion twice. Once without the directory where I took the pics and enjoyed just looking at everything without knowing much about it.

I then went to one of the seating areas looking out towards the Chantry Chapel and went through the directory, taking pics of each page (which I’ve included below with the rest of the pics) before going round again. As much as I do like knowing the information behind the piece I did like the cleaness of not having the information next to everything cluttering the space up, so I think the directory booklet was a good idea.

As you can probably tell I really enjoyed this exhibition, it’s on until the 8th of June so if you do get chance to go then I recommend that you do. More info at the end.

Disobedient Bodies: JW Anderson Curates The Hepworth Wakefield

18 March – 18 June 2017

This major exhibition sees Jonathan Anderson, one of the world’s most innovative contemporary fashion designers, exploring the human form in art, fashion and design.

A personal selection of sculptures are on display, alongside notable fashion pieces and objects of craft and design, investigating the way the human form has been reconceived by artists and designers across the 20th and 21st centuries.

The selection is shaped by Anderson’s long-standing passion for modern art (from the mid-20th century) and the underlying questions of gender that have been posed by his own fashion collections at JW Anderson

Figurative sculptures by artists including Jean Arp, Louise Bourgeois, Lynn Chadwick, Naum Gabo, Barbara Hepworth, Sarah Lucas, Henry Moore, Magali Reus and Dorothea Tanning are in direct dialogue with fashion pieces by designers such as Christian Dior, Jean Paul Gaultier, Rei Kawakubo of Commes des Garçons, Helmut Lang and Issey Miyake.

The exhibition also features a new series of photographs by Jamie Hawkesworth who Dazed describe as ‘one of the most visionary fashion photographers working today’. Hawkesworth worked in the gallery with 123 Yorkshire school children wearing fashion pieces by designers including Issy Miyake and Vivienne Westwood. Find out more

Anderson has collaborated with Tom Emerson and Stephanie Macdonald of 6a architects to present this exhibition, which unfolds across the galleries, offering a series of contrasting experiences for you to explore.

MORE ABOUT  JW ANDERSON

Jonathan Anderson was born in Northern Ireland in 1984 and studied menswear at the London College of Fashion. He established his label JW Anderson in 2008 with a menswear collection. In 2010 he launched a capsule collection for women, quickly achieving critical acclaim and commercial success.

JW Anderson is regarded as one of London’s most forward thinking brands, with a unique design aesthetic that offers a modern interpretation of masculinity and femininity. In 2013 investment by LVMH Moet Hennessy further cemented JW Anderson’s status as a rising, new generation brand. In the same year Jonathan was appointed Creative Director of Loewe and works on both brands in tandem.

JW Anderson has evolved into an internationally renowned and award-winning brand. Awards include British  Fashion Award for ‘Emerging Talent, Ready-to-Wear’ (2012), ‘The New Establishment Award’ (2013) and ‘Menswear Designer of the Year’ (2014). He was also the first designer to win both womenswear and menswear designer in the same year at the British Fashion Awards (2015).  

The Hepworth Wakefield
Gallery Walk
Wakefield, West Yorkshire
WF1 5AW

OPENING HOURS, FREE ADMISSION

Tuesday – Sunday, 10am – 5pm
Closed Mondays, except local school holidays and bank holiday Monday

 

Till next time,

Take care.

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

Purple Faye Art Adventure: The Hepworth Wakefield Spring Market 2017

Last Saturday (8th April) I went to the Spring Market at The Hepworth Wakefield.

Held in The Calder, this was the first year of it taking place as part of their Easter program of events. “featuring specially selected food produce, textiles, homewares, ceramics, cosmetics, jewellery, stationery and more, sourced and produced by regionally-based artists, makers, designers and bakers.”

The street market was also there serving a range of cuisines, cakes, coffee and local ales along with live music from local musicians.

As it was a lovely sunny day a lot of people were enjoying the street market sat on the grass.

I thought it was a good idea for The Hepworth to hold a Spring Market in The Calder but I think they could have done with more stalls or to let the ones that were there spread out a bit. When I walked in it only seemed to be half full with all the stalls squished together at one end, which was a bit disappointing. The stalls that were there had some lovely things though, and it was nice to see Ali Appleby (studio holder at The Art House) for a quick catchup and a look at her latest beautiful printed wares. I even treated my boyfriend to some award winning, it won the bronze award in the Louisiana ultra hot category in 2015, really hot sauce from The Unusual Chutney Company which he said was nice but not as hot as he thought it was going to be. (He was at work when I went so wasn’t able to come along with me)

“Stall holders include:

Ali Appleby
A H Jewellery
BAKESBOX
Block Culture
Brockleby’s Pies
Arthur Dove Infusions
Dandelion Cocoa
Factory Floor Jewels

Fruity Tipples
Geo Fleur
Katey and Josephine
LIFE IS better in COLOUR
Little Badger Cider Co
Little Shop of Lathers
Lovely Cosmetics
Mary’s House Designs

Miriam Griffiths Knitwear
Mister Charlesworth
North Doodle Co
Rach Red Designs
Red Paper House 
Rich and Fancy Cupcakes
Riddles
Seasonal Larder
Slow Rise Bagels
Snug Aromatics
Sophie Eveleigh Ceramics
West Plum Studio
Thrifty Maker
Tuck X Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun
The Unusual Chutney Co
What Kate Loves
Winning Works

Street Food Market:

Dim Sum Su, Golden Balls, Hull Pie Company and Noisette Bakehouse”

Taken from http://www.hepworthwakefield.org/whatson/spring-market/

 

I look forward to seeing what other fairs/markets/events The Hepworth puts on in The Calder this year, I may even apply to take part in some too.

 

Till next time

Take care

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

Art Adventure: Wakefield Artwalk 25th Jan’17

On Wednesday (Jan 25th ’17) it was the first Wakefield Artwalk of 2017. As usual there was plenty to see and do, I didn’t manage to get round it all but here are some of my highlights:

13. Neon Workshops – Richard William Wheater “Things people Say”

10. Harry’s Bar – Art and Ale exhibition of vibrant new works by Hoshi Dee, curated by WE ARE (Amy and Lucy of WE ARE/CRUX can be spotted in one of the pics taken there)

11. Unity Works – An exhibition of paintings by Lucy Morrison ‘The Yorkshire Landscape: An Exploration of Colour and Form’

8. Theatre Royal Wakefield – An exhibition of works by photography students from Wakefield College, responding to the theme of ‘Parenthood’

7. The Art House – Guided studio tour and exhibition of work ‘Widows and Orphans’ by artist in residence Jamie Shovlin, listen to him in conversation with Bryony Bond (Creative Director at The Tetley, Leeds)

5. Outside Wakefield One – Ella Holland created a Wall Mural as a product of her Graduate Residency at The Art House in October 2016.

12. Westgate Studios – Open Studios and Studio Holders Exhibition.

3. Wakefield Beer Exchange – An exhibition of new digital media works by artist Helen Field, presented by WE ARE.

6. The Cathedral Centre – Artists Rachel Richardson and Beth Rose Pop-up workshops.

The Wakefield Artwalk is held on the last Wednesday of every other month starting in January and finishing in November. The next one is the 29th March. Find out more at www.artwalk.org.uk

Hope to see you there.

 

Till next time,

Take care

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

Art Adventure – Illuminating York 2016

Last Thursday (27th October 2016) we went on an adventure to York to see Illuminating York, Weds 26th -Sat 29th 6pm-10pm.

“The festival invites you to explore and discover the city through the imagination of artists, using the medium of light in all its forms.

This year the festival will open up some of York’s most famous, most interesting and intriguing buildings by night, to experience them in a completely new way. Outdoors, buildings, spaces and places will also host installations using light and projection. Travel between these sites and spot our bunny lights in York’s shop windows along the way.”

We started at Cliffords Tower to see Lumenpulse then walked over to The National Railway Museum for Travelling Light by Heinrich and Palmer and the work by Leeds City College students  (once we found where to get in, as the main entrance wasn’t open and it wasn’t well signposted either). Next we made our way to York St John University for Lumen by David Ogle plus the work by students there too, stopping off at Exhibition Square on the way for NoHL: Pockets of Light Shades of Light by Society of Light and Lighting (SLL) working with York Schools to light part of the walls in Exhibition Square. Last we walked over to the Minster, spotting some of the bunnies on the bunnie trail on the way.

 

I’d been to Light Night Leeds at the beginning of the month (you can read about it in my blog post here) which I had really enjoyed, so my expectations were high. Sadly I was disappointed with Illuminating York (we both were, and he didn’t even get to go to Leeds). It says on the website that it’s “York’s biggest Night-Time Festival” but to me it didn’t feel like a festival like it did in Leeds. More like a few events that happened to be going on at the same time. In Leeds it felt like everything was tied together and part of one big city wide event. This was helped by the maps telling you where things were which were given out at the events themselves, plus in specific places that were easy to see and by helpful people handing them out there too. If there were maps being given out in York I didn’t see them, just the one on the website, which made it harder to find the things that were going on so there were a few more things that we didn’t get to see. Even so it still seemed that there were a lot more things going on at the Leeds Light Night and unfortunatley the Illuminating York website didn’t seem to be as professional looking and helpful as the one for Leeds either.

http://www.illuminatingyork.org.uk/

It didn’t seem to be as busy as the event in Leeds either, which could have been because this one was over 4 days rather than 2, but even so it still seemed quiet in comparison.

I didn’t intend for this blog post to be a comparison of the two events but as they were similar I suppose it was inevitable. It’s a shame that I found York to be lacking with it’s event. It’s not that I didn’t enjoy it, I just didn’t enjoy it as much as I thought I was going to so it was a bit disappointing. It was fun to visit the National Railway Museum at night and see the trains lit up dramatically, and I really liked the light trees of Lumen at York St John University. It was even nice to see Cliffords Tower lit up and spot the bunnies on the trail but still it felt like there should have been more and better.

Hopefully they might take more inspiration from Light Night Leeds for next years event and make it a bit more worth the trip.

If you went what did you think to it?

Comment below, I’d love to hear your thoughts.

 

Till next time.

Take care,

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

 

Art Adventure – Light Night Leeds 2016

Last Friday (7th october 2016) I went on an adventure to Leeds for Light Night Leeds.

“As darkness falls, come and see the city in a new light…..”

I’d not been to “Leeds’ biggest free annual multi-arts event”before so I’d been looking forward to going this year. Especially as this year was it’s 12th anniversary, and for the first time it took place over two nights, Thursday 6th and Friday 7th.

“Exploring the elements earth, wind, water and fire the city came alive with over 50 artworks including spectacular light projections, as well as film, dance, music, theatre, exhibitions and street performances.”

As it was still light when I got there at 6pm I started by walking up from the train station towards the Library. As I got closer I looked up at the Town Hall to see the pink lighting showing up as it started to get dark.

Next I looked across at the Waterlight Graffiti, Antonin Fourneau, Victoria Gardens (The Headrow, LS1 3AA Thursday and Friday 6 –11pm) an interactive installation made of a wall embedded with thousands of LEDs which light up if their surface is touched by water. Anything damp becomes a tool to drive or write: a sponge, a brush, a water gun, or even a water atomizer to act as an eco-friendly graffiti artist. Developed by French artist, Antonin Fourneau, the project was research led and explores water-sensitive materials.

Then just outside the Library was The Indestructible Reef, Alison M Smith, Victoria Gardens (The Headrow, LS1 3AA Thursday and Friday 6 –11pm) a series of glowing sculptures created from recycled plastic, crafted to mimic organic forms. Alison Smith transforms waste materials into beautiful objects. She aims to illustrate the effects waste plastics have on our oceans, with plastic particles already outweighing plankton by 26:1 in some areas.

I entered Leeds Central Library, (Central Library, Calverley Street, LS1 3AB, Friday 5 –10pm) to Explore the Elements. Encountering the unexpected through art and crafts, films and displays created especially for the night. Stories of lost voyages and daring expeditions through the rare books and historic maps in the beautiful Grade II* listed building.

Also in the Library: Owl’s Shadow on the Moonlit Earth, Douglas Thompson (Central Library, Calverley Street, LS1 3AB, Friday 6 –10pm) a 3D shadow show inspired by Robert Plack’s elemental poem “The Snowy Owl”. Meet your shadow on the screen and make magical images that leap out into space as you participate in this original performance by artist Douglas Thompson with live music by Max Trewhitt.

And  H2Us, Artlink West Yorkshire & Love Arts (Central Library, Calverley Street, LS1 3AB
Friday 6 –10pm) We are over 50% water. H2Us is a sculpture with droplets floating in the frame representing our connection with water. The constantly moving droplets will glimmer and glitter as they turn in the rising air currents. Participants will be invited, alongside artists Jim Bond and Rozi Fuller, to create their own lanterns inspired by the sculpture.

Next I walked to Briggate for Ethereal Freeze, Glacial Art Ice Sculptors (Briggate, LS1 6LX Friday 6 – 11pm) a transient installation, using ice and light to capture the fleeting beauty of fire, wind, earth and water.

And the Local Artisans’ Market (Briggate, LS1 6LX Friday 3pm –10.30pm) a market displaying the work of local artisans, a wide range of handmade gifts and lively atmosphere on one of Leeds’ most famous streets. A variety of art, ceramics, print and silversmithing. Where I met the lovely Perky Painter Helen Gibson.

From Briggate I walked up to St John the Evangelist Church to see Elemental, Hannah Stained Glass (St John the Evangelist Church Gardens, Mark Lane, LS2 8JA Friday 6 –11pm)
Four hand-crafted stained glass windows cast their magic and transport you on a journey through the elements. Travel from earth, through the air, out of the fire and into the cooling water created by colour and light.

And then inside the church itself for [in]visible, Si ieng Fung  (St John the Evangelist Church, Mark Lane, LS2 8JA Friday 6 –11pm) Artist, Si ieng Fung, uses transparent materials to shed light upon the marvellous architectural detail of historical buildings in Leeds. [in]visible reveals all that has faded into the background of this modern metropolitan city. Visitors are invited to share which buildings have played parts in their lives.

Just round the back of the church were The Giant Dandelions, Olivia d’Aboville (Merrion Gardens, Merrion Street, LS2 8JG Thursday and Friday 6 – 11pm) The Giant Dandelions installation is a forest of 90 giant lit flowers. Through manipulating over 9,000 recycled bottles, the artist refers to our consumerist society that is polluting our environment. She creates work that is sensitive to light, fluidity and movement, allowing you to walk through the forest with a more sensitive connection to the environment.

Next I went over to Millennium Square to see The Phoenix in the Stone, Illuminos (Civic Hall, Millennium Square, LS1 1UR Thursday and Friday 7.30pm –11pm) Returning after the epic Momentous (2013), Illuminos present The Phoenix in the Stone, a beautiful fable for the four quarters of Yorkshire, weaved from shadow and light. Watch the metamorphosis as the firebird soars, projected onto the Civic Hall.

Then inside The Carriageworks for Afterglow, Atipyka-Visualab (Auditorium, The Carriageworks, Millennium Square, LS2 3AD Friday 6 –11pm) a cubic frame audio-visual installation. A series of geometric animations are projected through six semi-transparent screens. With an unusual usage of light, the audience are surrounded by an audio-visual journey where time and space is bent upon itself, creating a new dimension inside the structure and guiding the viewers through the four basic natural elements.

And over to Leeds City College, Technology Campus (Cookridge Street, LS2 8BL Friday 7.30 –11pm) to see the work projected on a billboard showcasing an eclectic assortment of student work, encapsulating the symbiotic spirit of the elements. Through projections of creative arts, games, animation and videos, spectators can revel in the delights of the achievements of college students and enjoy the diversity of talent and creativity.

Before walking up to Queen Square to see the Fire Balls, Aragorn Dick-Read (Queen Square, LS2 8AJ, Friday 6 – 11pm) Large cut out steel shapes by Caribbean artist, Aragorn Dick-Read, set alight as night sets in. These provocative sculptures evoke primal energy and use the vitality of fire to bring life to his intricately cut designs. Dancing figures embracing nature, or profound symbolic patterns that embody the oppositions faced by culture and the elements.

Past the Light Show on the outside of First Direct Arena (Clay Pit Lane, LS2 8BY, Friday 7 –11pm) Leeds’ flagship event space, First Direct Arena, hosts exciting live music, comedy, spectacular entertainment and sporting events. For Light Night, they are putting on an extra special light display.

Down to the Love Arts Festival at Leeds Corn Exchange (Call Lane, LS1 7BR Friday 6 –11pm)
Pop up exhibitions, performances, DJs, live music and workshops that promote the idea that being creative is good for your mental health. Events will take place underground on the Piazza level of Leeds Corn Exchange. Join in the arts party under the Earth! Presented by Love Arts Festival and the Art of Recovery.

Across to We are Universe, Leeds College of Music, Northern School of Contemporary Dance, Leeds College of Art, Oscar Barany, Nicolas Dixon, Motiv Productions. Supported by Leeds BID (Kirkgate Market Event Space, 28-34 George St, LS2 7HY Friday 6.30 –11pm)
This collaborative installation of improvised music, dance, digital visual art and animation, explores the relationship between the elements in the universe and the human interactions which make up our communities. Internationally renowned artist Nicolas Dixon has been commissioned to paint the 100ft wall inside the iconic Kirkgate Market. To mark the unveiling of this stunning new work on Light Night, award winning Leeds based video production company Motiv Productions will be augmenting the piece with brand new animations.

Then sadly it was time to make my way back to the train station to catch the last train home so I finished with The Falls, Dave Lynch (Queens Hotel, City Square, LS1 1PJ Thursday and Friday 7.30 –11pm) a creative exploration of the flow and form of water. A 100ft digital waterfall taking us on a journey from the abstract to the hyper real, driven in perfect synchronization by a musical score inspired by the chaotic forces of nature’s white noise.

There was so much more to see that I didn’t have time to, but I had a great time seeing all the things that I did get to and even though there was a bit of drizzle here and there it was nice to see that so many other people were enjoing it all too.

 

Information taken from the Light Night Leeds 2016 Guide  find out more at

http://whatson.leeds.gov.uk/lightnight/Documents/Light%20Night%20guide%202016.pdf

 

Till next time,

Take care

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk