How to Make Your Own Mermaid 3D Picture like artist Purple Faye’s Original 3D Acrylic Painting

In this blog post I’m going to show you how to make your own mermaid 3D picture like artist Purple Faye’s (me) original 3D acrylic painting, using the ‘Make Your Own Mermaid 3D Picture Kit’ by Yorkshire artist Purple Faye.

First, you need to buy the kit here

Your kit contains step-by-step instructions to talk you through the cardboard and modroc stages of making your mermaid 3D picture. However, as the kits don’t contain paints I don’t go into any detail as to how you might like to paint it. You can enjoy making it up for yourself but just in case you’d like some guidance here’s how I made the original 3D acrylic painting that the kits are based on.

I started by drawing the mermaid design directly onto the piece of cardboard, you have the design already drawn for you by me in the form of the template, so all you need to do is cut it out and use that. I then cut out the design and made another layer for the face, it’s just another piece of cardboard cut into a circle the same as the one in the original design, and raised the end of the tail by drawing round it onto another piece of card and placing it underneath the original.

I used the rounded end of a pencil to push in the eyes, then stuck it all down onto the blank canvas with PVA/craft glue and left it to dry.

It is this stage that makes them really 3D but because it’s cardboard it isn’t as heavy as people think it will be when they think it’s solid plaster being used.

The next stage was to apply the modroc (bandages with plaster of Paris in them) over the cardboard layers. I did this by getting my piece of modroc and cutting it to the rough shape of what I needed, keeping in mind that it shrinks when wet so it’d need to be a bit bigger plus have some overlap to go round the edges too. I cut it when it’s dry as it’s easier to cut when it’s dry rather than wet. Plus once it gets wet that’s it you have to use it, so if you don’t need to use it all then you can’t save any offcuts for later.

I wet the modroc by filling a container (an old Tupperware dish) with cold water (using cold water slows down the setting time so you have longer to use it, warm water speeds it up) and a squirt of PVA/craft glue then dunking each piece of cut out modroc separately to try and reduce the amount of scrunching up in the water.

When removing the modroc from the water I try to wring out as much water as I can without distorting the shape too much. I then place it on top of the cardboard and start to smooth it out so it covers all the area that I need it to. I continue to do this until the whole cardboard shape is completely covered. Finally I use two small squares of modroc to make the shell bra by rolling them into a ball when wet then smushing them into place. Then I leave it to dry.

When the modroc is setting and still wet it looks a lightish grey colour and gets more white the drier it gets. I try to leave mine overnight at least to make sure it’s fully dry, it dries faster the warmer it is so if you wanted to speed up the process you can use a hairdryer on it.

Once it’s dry I give mine a quick sand with some fine sandpaper, just to get rid of any rough bits, then I start to paint it with acrylic paints. You can use whatever paints you have available though. For this one I used white, red (to mix pink), orange, yellow, green, blue, black and silver.

I started by painting the whole of the mermaid white, once as the base coat to seal the modroc and then another top coat to make sure it was fully covered. Next I painted the face, arms and torso pink, the hair orange and then once it was dry painted in yellow highlights. I painted the tail turquoise, by mixing the green with a bit of blue and white, then added a bit more blue to the mix to paint in the scales. White was used for the eyes, necklace and shell bra, with silver for the shell bra details.

Next was black for the eyes, nose, mouth and bellybutton and a bit of red/pink for the blush cheeks. Finally, I mixed a light blue to paint the canvas background with.

So now you know how to make your own mermaid 3D picture like artist Purple Faye’s (me) original 3D acrylic painting, using the ‘Make Your Own mermaid 3D Picture Kit’ by Yorkshire artist Purple Faye.

Enjoy making your kit and if you do get stuck contact me for help.

Find me on social media:

Facebook: facebook.com/purplefaye.co.uk

Instagram: instagram.com/purplefaye_art

Purple Faye x

How to Make Your Own Ballerina 3D Picture like artist Purple Faye’s Original 3D Acrylic Painting

In this blog post I’m going to show you how to make your own Ballerina 3D picture like artist Purple Faye’s (me) original 3D acrylic painting, using the ‘Make Your Own Ballerina 3D Picture Kit’ by Yorkshire artist Purple Faye.

First, you need to buy the kit here

Your kit contains step-by-step instructions to talk you through the cardboard and modroc stages of making your ballerina 3D picture. However, as the kits don’t contain paints I don’t go into any detail as to how you might like to paint it. You can enjoy making it up for yourself but just in case you’d like some guidance here’s how I made the original 3D acrylic painting that the kits are based on.

I started by drawing the ballerina design directly onto the piece of cardboard, you have the design already drawn for you by me in the form of the template, so all you need to do is cut it out and use that. I cut out the cardboard design, created an extra layer for the face and tutu, and used the rounded end of a pencil to make the eyes by pressing into the cardboard.

I pressed down on the hair, legs and arms to squash them, so they didn’t stand out as far in certain places, I also ran the rounded end of the pencil round the sides of the outline, to squash them down a bit too. Finally, I stuck it all down onto the blank canvas with PVA/craft glue and left it to dry.

It is this stage that makes them really 3D but because it’s cardboard it isn’t as heavy as people think it will be when they think it’s solid plaster being used.

The next stage was to apply the modroc (bandages with plaster of Paris in them) over the cardboard layers. I did this by getting my piece of modroc and cutting it to the rough shape of what I needed, keeping in mind that it shrinks when wet so it’d need to be a bit bigger plus have some overlap to go round the edges too. I cut it when it’s dry as it’s easier to cut when it’s dry rather than wet. Plus once it gets wet that’s it you have to use it, so if you don’t need to use it all then you can’t save any offcuts for later.

I wet the modroc by filling a container (an old Tupperware dish) with cold water (using cold water slows down the setting time so you have longer to use it, warm water speeds it up) and a squirt of PVA/craft glue then dunking each piece of cut out modroc separately to try and reduce the amount of scrunching up in the water. When removing the modroc from the water I try to wring out as much water as I can without distorting the shape too much. I then place it on top of the cardboard and start to smooth it out so it covers all the area that I need it to. I continue to do this until the whole cardboard shape is completely covered. To add some texture to the tutu I add some more modroc, on top of the piece that I’ve smoothed over the cardboard, and scrunch it up to create wrinkles then I leave it to dry.

When the modroc is setting and still wet it looks a lightish grey colour and gets more white the drier it gets. I try to leave mine overnight at least to make sure it’s fully dry, it dries faster the warmer it is so if you wanted to speed up the process you can use a hairdryer on it.

Once it’s dry I give mine a quick sand with some fine sandpaper, just to get rid of any rough bits, then I start to paint it with acrylic paints. You can use whatever paints you have available though. For this one I used white, red (to mix pink), dark brown, orange brown, silver, blue and black.

I started by painting the whole of the ballerina white, once as the base coat to seal the modroc and then another top coat to make sure it was fully covered. Next I painted the face, arms and legs pink, painted the hair first with the dark brown then added orange brown highlights once it had dried. I then used white to paint in the shoes, hairband, eyes, necklace and straps for the dress. I used the silver on top of the white on the tutu, shoes and straps then added the face details with black and a bit of pink on the cheeks. Finally, I mixed a light blue to paint the canvas background with.

So now you know how to make your own ballerina 3D picture like artist Purple Faye’s (me) original 3D acrylic painting, using the ‘Make Your Own ballerina 3D Picture Kit’ by Yorkshire artist Purple Faye.

Enjoy making your kit and if you do get stuck contact me for help.

Find me on social media:

Facebook: facebook.com/purplefaye.co.uk

Instagram: instagram.com/purplefaye_art

Purple Faye x

How to Make Your Own Stegosaurus Dinosaur 3D Picture like artist Purple Faye’s Original 3D Acrylic Painting

In this blog post I’m going to show you how to make your own stegosaurus dinosaur 3D picture like artist Purple Faye’s (me) original 3D acrylic painting, using the ‘Make Your Own Stegosaurus 3D Picture Kit’ by Yorkshire artist Purple Faye.

First, you need to buy the kit here

Your kit contains step-by-step instructions to talk you through the cardboard and modroc stages of making your stegosaurus dinosaur 3D picture. However, as the kits don’t contain paints I don’t go into any detail as to how you might like to paint it. You can enjoy making it up for yourself but just in case you’d like some guidance here’s how I made the original 3D acrylic painting that the kits are based on.

I started by drawing the stegosaurus dinosaur design directly onto the piece of cardboard, you have the design already drawn for you by me in the form of the template, so all you need to do is cut it out and use that. In the step-by-step instructions I have simplified things slightly but if you want to follow how I made this one I started by cutting out the whole shape from the cardboard and then cut out an eye shape piece.

I pressed down on the legs and tail to squash them, so they didn’t stand out as far as the rest, I also did around the underside of the belly so it looked more rounded. Finally, I squashed every other backplate, so that some stood out more than the others and then stuck it all down onto the blank canvas with PVA/craft glue and left them to dry.

It is this stage that makes them really 3D but because it’s cardboard it isn’t as heavy as people think it will be when they think it’s solid plaster being used.

The next stage was to apply the modroc (bandages with plaster of Paris in them) over the cardboard layers. I did this by getting my piece of modroc and cutting it to the rough shape of what I needed, keeping in mind that it shrinks when wet so it’d need to be a bit bigger plus have some overlap to go round the edges too. I cut it when it’s dry as it’s easier to cut when it’s dry rather than wet. Plus once it gets wet that’s it you have to use it, so if you don’t need to use it all then you can’t save any offcuts for later.

I wet the modroc by filling a container (an old Tupperware dish) with cold water (using cold water slows down the setting time so you have longer to use it, warm water speeds it up) and a squirt of PVA/craft glue then dunking each piece of cut out modroc separately to try and reduce the amount of scrunching up in the water. When removing the modroc from the water I try to wring out as much water as I can without distorting the shape too much. I then place it on top of the cardboard and start to smooth it out so it covers all the area that I need it to. I continue to do this until the whole cardboard shape is completely covered. Then I leave it to dry

When the modroc is setting and still wet it looks a lightish grey colour and gets more white the drier it gets. I try to leave mine overnight at least to make sure it’s fully dry, it dries faster the warmer it is so if you wanted to speed up the process you can use a hairdryer on it.

Once it’s dry I give mine a quick sand with some fine sandpaper, just to get rid of any rough bits, then I start to paint it with acrylic paints. You can use whatever paints you have available though. For this one I only used white, green, yellow, blue and black.

I started by painting the whole of the stegosaurus dinosaur white, once as the base coat to seal the modroc and then another top coat to make sure it was fully covered. Next I painted the body green, painted the eye black and added yellow spots. Finally, I mixed a light blue to paint the canvas background with.

So now you know how to make your own stegosaurus dinosaur 3D picture like artist Purple Faye’s (me) original 3D acrylic painting, using the ‘Make Your Own Stegosaurus 3D Picture Kit’ by Yorkshire artist Purple Faye.

Enjoy making your kit and if you do get stuck contact me for help.

Find me on social media:

Facebook: facebook.com/purplefaye.co.uk

Instagram: instagram.com/purplefaye_art

Purple Faye x

How to Make Your Own Unicorn 3D Picture like artist Purple Faye’s Original 3D Acrylic Painting (rectangle version)

In this blog post I’m going to show you how to make your own unicorn 3D picture like artist Purple Faye’s (me) original 3D acrylic painting, the rectangle version, using the ‘Make Your Own Unicorn 3D Picture Kit’ by Yorkshire artist Purple Faye

First, you need to buy the kit here

Your kit contains step-by-step instructions to talk you through the cardboard and modroc stages of making your Unicorn 3D picture. However, as the kits don’t contain paints I don’t go into any detail as to how you might like to paint it. You can enjoy making it up for yourself but just in case you’d like some guidance here’s how I made the original 3D acrylic painting that the kits are based on.

Using the template I created I started by cutting it out and drawing round it onto the cardboard. I then cut the head/mane off of the template and used this to cut out another cardboard shape. To finish the cardboard stage I cut out the eye and placed all the cardboard cut out shapes onto the blank canvas, stuck them down with PVA/craft glue and left them to dry. It is this stage that makes them really 3D but because it’s cardboard it isn’t as heavy as people think it will be when they think it’s solid plaster being used.

The next stage was to apply the modroc (bandages with plaster of Paris in them) over the cardboard layers. I did this by getting my piece of modroc and cutting it to the rough shape of what I needed, keeping in mind that it shrinks when wet so it’d need to be a bit bigger plus have some overlap to go round the edges too. I cut it when it’s dry as it’s easier to cut when it’s dry rather than wet. Plus once it gets wet that’s it you have to use it, so if you don’t need to use it all then you can’t save any offcuts for later.

I wet the modroc by filling a container (an old Tupperware dish) with cold water (using cold water slows down the setting time so you have longer to use it, warm water speeds it up) and a squirt of PVA/craft glue then dunking each piece of cut out modroc separately to try and reduce the amount of scrunching up in the water. When removing the modroc from the water I try to wring out as much water as I can without distorting the shape too much. I then place it on top of the cardboard and start to smooth it out so it covers all the area that I need it to.

Once it’s all covered, including the sides where it meets the canvas, I then use extra bits on top of the hair/mane and tail to give it more texture. I did this by scrunching/ruffling it up and using my thumbnail, once it started to set, to gently score some lines into it too. You could also try cutting strips, wetting them and rolling them into sausages then placing them on top. To give a kind of dreadlocks appearance.

When the modroc is setting and still wet it looks a lightish grey colour and gets more white the drier it gets. I try to leave mine overnight at least to make sure it’s fully dry, it dries faster the warmer it is so if you wanted to speed up the process you can use a hairdryer on it.

Once it’s dry I give mine a quick sand with some fine sandpaper, just to get rid of any rough bits, then I start to paint it with acrylic paints. You can use whatever paints you have available though. For this one I only used white, shiny purple, gold, blue and black.

I started by painting the whole of the unicorn white, once as the base coat to seal the modroc and then another top coat to make sure it was fully covered. Next I painted the horn gold and the hair/mane and tail in the shiny purple, I mixed a light grey with the black and white to add some shading details to the legs, head and horn. I used the black to add the details on the face (eyes, nose and mouth) then I finished it off by mixing a light blue and painting the canvas background with it.

So now you know how to make your own unicorn 3D picture like artist Purple Faye’s (me) original 3D acrylic painting, the rectangle version, using the ‘Make Your Own Unicorn 3D Picture Kit’ by Yorkshire artist Purple Faye

Enjoy making your kit and if you do get stuck contact me for help.

Find me on social media:

Facebook: facebook.com/purplefaye.co.uk

Instagram: instagram.com/purplefaye_art

Purple Faye x

How Yorkshire Artist Purple Faye made the commissioned 3D Acrylic Painting of the American Office Building

In this blog post I’m going to show you how I made this commissioned 3D acrylic painting. The commission was to make a 3D acrylic painting version of a watercolour of the office building featured in the American version of The Office TV show. The significance of this watercolour is that it’s painted by one of the characters, Pam Beesly, in the show.

When I was first contacted about this commission I had to get my head around the fact that I’d firstly be doing a building, which are tricky because of the precision involved with the straight lines and propotions, secondly it’s a copy of someone elses work in a different medium so thirdly I’d have to tranlate the traits of the water colour painting into my own 3D acrylic painting style.

I enjoy a challenge though so was more than happy to take it on. Here’s how I did it:

Working from the picture that the customer sent me I started by drawing out the basic outline onto the cardboard, then cut it out and layered it up so some parts stuck out more than others.

 

Next I laid the dried modroc (bandages with plaster of Paris in, like they use when you break your arm or leg) over the cardboard and cut it to size before dunking it in some water than smoothing it over the cardboard.

 

Once the modroc was dry I sanded it down to get rid of any rough bits then painted a white base coat with acrylic paint. I then drew on top of the base coat with pencil to make it easier to know where to paint the details in.

I started with the trees/hedges as they took up quite a large area felt like an easy way to ease myself into it before tackling the trickier building with all it’s straight lines, that’s also why I did the cars first too.

I decided to paint the black lines in first then use the lighter colours of the building stonework and windows to neated them up and narrow them down. I did this so the pencil lines didn’t get lost by painting over them with the lighter colours first. It meant that I could try and keep them as straight as I could by reducing them to the right size rather than trying to add them afterwards.

Once the building had been completed I moved onto the sky and the foreground carpark.

After a few final details it was finished.

 

IMG_4818

I’m pleased to say that the customer was happy with it, they even said ” So much better than I expected it to be. I love it.” which is so lovely to hear.

If you’d like me to make you your own 3D acrylic painting, as you can see it can be of anything that is significant to you, then get it touch.

purplefaye.co.uk/contact

To see my current commission price list and more of my previous commissions go to:

purplefaye.co.uk/commissions

You can find me on social media if you fancy a chat there

facebook.com/purplefaye.co.uk

Instagram: @purplefaye_art

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Sign up here

 

Till next time,

Take care.

Purple Faye x

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How to make your own Love Hearts 3D picture like artist Purple Faye.

Earlier this year I took part in Holmfirth Artweek artist demonstrations, 7th-13th July 2019, this time I showed you how to make your very own Love Hearts 3D picture using one of my kits. This is one of my more simple but effective designs which would be ideal for an absolute beginner to make.

 

In the pictures below you can see how I used the template included in the kit to draw out the cardboard layers (the instructions included in the kit tell you which bits you need to cut out), these were then stuck together on the canvas and left to dry.

Next I cut the dry modroc (bandages with plaster of Paris in) to size before I dunked it in a water and PVA/craft glue solution, wrung out the water and spread it out on top of the cardboard love hearts.

This is the stage that the kit gets you too, you then need to leave it to dry. (Mine had from Friday afternoon until Saturday morning in warm temperatures, yours may need longer or you may need to use a hairdryer to help speed things up a bit.)

While you’re waiting for it to dry you can get your paints ready that you’re going to use. I use acrylic paints and all I needed for this was black, white and red (I mixed the pink colour myself using the red and white). I started by painting the large heart in red, I then mixed my pink and used that on the smaller heart once the red was dry. Once the pink was dry I used white to add the highlights in the corners (as shown on the template) and then finished it off with a black background.

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If you have already bought one of my kits thank you, if you haven’t got one yet but would like to then they are available from my etsy shop here or you can contact me directly here.

If you require any more help/advice then please contact me.

 

Till next time.

Take care.

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

 

How artist Purple Faye made the commisisoned Spitfire 3D acrylic painting

As it’s coming up to Fathers Day on the 16th on June I thought I’d show you how I made this 3D acrylic painting that was commissioned as a Fathers day gift a few years ago, while I was in my shop in Castleford.

This Spitfire is the actual model, MK11A P8098/PRZ Enfield Spitfire, that his father used to make. He wanted it to be based on the image that he had in his book that had all the different Spitfire models in to use, which is why it looks the way it does. A flat diagram/illustration made into a painting rather than an actual 3D plane.

The customer chose to have it made on a 16x20inch canvas (approx 30x40cm) so I started by selecting a piece of cardboard that would suit being used on a canvas of that size. I was a bit concerned about it being a long thin shape getting lost in the large space of the canvas but after some tests I managed to make it work and began to draw out the design onto the cardboard.

I drew quite a lot of the details in, more than I really needed to at this stage but I wanted to make sure that it would all look ok at that size, not too squashed or out of proportion, before I got further along in the process.

Once I was happy with the outline design I could then start to think about how to make it 3D. I started by cutting out the main outline and then used some of the offcuts to make certain areas more 3D than others by layering it up. The main body has 2 layers then the closest front and back wings and cockpit got another layer to make them stand out further from the main body. So overall there are 3 layers of cardboard making this 3D acrylic painting.

Once the cardboard had been stuck together onto the blank canvas I then put the modroc (bandages with plaster of Paris in them) on top. I cut it to shape first when it was dry then dunked it into a water and PVA/craft glue solution to help it stick onto the cardboard. Once it was fully wet I then wrung the excess water out and placed it on top of the cardboard, smoothing it out so it covered it fully. (It wouldn’t look like metal if it had a fluffy texture like a dog or highland cow). Any little gaps around the sides I filled with small pieces of modroc.

After the modroc had been left to dry completely I gave it a sand down to give myself a smooth surface to paint on, quick wipe down to remove the dust and then the painting with acrylic paints could begin. Starting with a dark green for the base coat then starting to paint the markings in, gradually building up the details, adding the shadows and highlights then finally a light blue background as selected by the customer.

 

When the customer came in to collect the piece they were very happy with it, the smile on their face was so great to see and made me smile too, it’s such a lovely feeling seeing how much someone likes what I’ve made.

If seeing this has given you an idea for a 3D acrylic painting you’d like me to make you, either for yourself or to give as a gift for someone else then get in touch.

Take a look on my etsy shop at my selection of Fathers Day cards available to buy now.

 

Till next time.

Take care.

Purple Faye x

 

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How to make your own Cat 3D picture like artist Purple Faye.

Thank you for buying one of my kits to make your own Cat 3D Picture.

Here is how I made the original Cat 3D acrylic painting.

When making your kit you don’t have to worry about drawing your own design as I have already done this for you in the form of the template. So all you need to do is use the template and follow the instructions that I included with the kit.

If you’d like some ideas of how to paint your Cat 3D picture then you can see how I used acrylic paint to paint mine below.

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If you require any more help/advice then please contact me.

 

Till next time.

Take care.

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

How artist Purple Faye made the ‘Smaller Daffodil’ 3D acrylic painting

Here’s how I made my ‘Smaller Daffodil’ 3D acrylic painting. (I also made the ‘Medium Daffodil’ at the same time as I made this, which you can see the making of here.)

I started with a cardboard box and cut out a piece that was roughly the same size as the blank canvas I was going to use. I chose quite a thick cardboard as I wanted it to be quite chunky all over, even the base layer which just uses one layer of cardboard.

Next I drew the daffodil design freehand onto the cardboard, using some photographs as a reference, and cut it out all along the outline.I seperated the flower head shape from the stem and placed them both onto the blank canvas to get an idea of the positioning. Placing the flower head on top of the top of the stem meant that it was raised and stuck out slightly more, then an extra layer for the circle in the middle made that the focal point that sticks out the most.

After sticking all the cardboard layers together onto the blank canvas and waiting for it to dry I could then cover it with modroc (plaster of Paris impregnated bandages) let that dry then start painting it with acrylic paints.

I decided to make this a traditional yellow daffodil with a green stem and a purple background to compliment the yellow and green. As with the ‘Medium Daffodil’ the dark purple on it’s own didn’t quite provide enough of a pop so I added the lighter purple and was happy with how it all worked together.

The finished piece is available to buy from my etsy shop.

Don’t forget to get 10% off in my etsy shop by getting the discount code here.

 

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Contact me here.

Till next time,

take care.

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

How artist Purple Faye made the ‘Raven’ 3D acrylic painting

I’d been making a series of animal 3D acrylic paintings, along with making pet portraits, because I like animals. I’d made two different macaws but I wanted to do some more birds to try out some different ways of making feather textures.

It was coming up to Halloween so I was inspired by that to make a raven, which gave me the idea to pair it with a Christmas inspired bird piece too in the form of a robin. (One of my favourite films is the Nightmare Before Christmas so that’s why I had the idea to pair uo Halloween with Christmas). You can see the making of the ‘Robin’ 3D acrylic painting here.

I started the process in my usual way of selecting a piece of cardboard and cutting it to the size of the canvas I wanted to use. I then used photographs as reference to freehand draw the design onto the cardboard.

Next I cut all along the outside of the drawing, making the 3D layers with more cardboard, and sticking it all together onto the blank canvas.

Once the layers had been cut out and stuck down the next step was to use modroc (plaster of Paris bandages) to cover the cardboard and create texture.

Finally when the modroc was dry I started to paint it with acrylic paints. First using black for the base coat, then working into it with greys and white and finishing with a pale blue and white background to contrast with the darkness of the bird and help it to stand out even more.

 

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Happy Halloween!

 

Till next time.

Take care.

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk