Making of Sleeping Dexter 3D acrylic painting by Pontefract artist Purple Faye at Holmfirth Artweek Demonstration 2017

On Thursday 6th and Friday 7th July 2017 I took part in the artist demonstrations at Holmfirth Artweek, which you can read more about here. I made four small 3D acrylic paintings while I was there, doing the cardboard and modroc stages on the first day then leaving them to dry and painting them on the second day.

This is one of the four that I made. ‘Sleeping Dexter’ working from a photograph of my cat Dexter that I had on my phone. I started by drawing directly on the cardboard, then cutting it out and overlapping the seperate pieces to make certain places stick out more than others. After the cardboard was stuck down with glue I then put the modroc on top.

The next day once the modroc was dry I started by painting white all over the cat shape, then the background a nice light purple. I then painted the rest of the details in. All the while talking to the people that came to see what I was doing.

The final 3D acrylic painting now has pride of place on my hallway wall along with the rest of my collection.

I’ll be showing the making of the other three paintings I made at Holmfirth Artweek soon, so keep a look out for them.

Don’t forget that if you would like to make your own 3D picture I have kits and do workshops.

Contact info@purplefaye.co.uk for more information.

 

Till next time,

Take care.

Purple Faye x

info@purplefaye.co.uk

purplefaye.co.uk

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Pontefract Artist Purple Faye at Holmfirth Artweek 2nd-8th July 2017

Starting at 10am on Sunday 2nd July and finishing at 5pm on Saturday the 8th of July in Holmfirth Civic Hall, the main exhibition, Holmfirth Artweek is one of the UK’s largest open art exhibitions. This year was my third year taking part, you can read about the preparation for it and my first and second years there in previous blog posts here, here and here.

This year I had two of my 3D acrylic paintings in the main exhibition and it was the first year that I put some of my cards and framed prints in the market too.

On the Thursday and Friday, 6th and 7th July 2017, I took part in the artist demonstrations. I’d done these in previous years too, the first year was just an afternoon and last year was for one day, so I had some idea of what to expect and was looking forward to them. I was looking forward to seeing the other artists demonstrations as much as I was looking forward to doing my own.

I’d decided that on the first day I would do the cardboard and modroc stages then leave them to dry overnight and paint them on the second day.

I’ll show more in depth work in progress shots of each of them and explain more about them too in seperate blog posts. This is just a brief overview so you can get an idea of what I got up to.

On the second day I had to have a bit of a shuffle about to make room for the artist who was going next to me.

I was also able to have some of my cards and framed prints on another table in the demo area too, just across from where I was so I could keep an eye on it.

Both the days passed really quickly and it wasn’t long until I was back on Saturday afternoon to collect anything that hadn’t sold. Sadly that was everything, but I’d still enjoyed it and have already been told that I can demo there on the Friday and Saturday next year so I’ll see you there!

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Holmfirth Artweek is run by volunteers so I’d like to say a big thank you to them all for all their hard work in making it run as smoothly as it did.

Find out more on holmfirthartweek.org.uk

 

Any questions?

Just ask in the comments below.

 

Till next time,

take care.

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

 

Art Adventure: Screen Printing Workshop with Laura Slater at The Art House, Wakefield

On Thursday, 8th June 2017, I managed to get a cancellation booking to do a screen printing workshop with Laura Slater at The Art House in Wakefield. A few days beforehand, I got the cancellation booking on the Monday morning, I received an email explaining that I needed to have my image ready to print. This meant having the master image and then separating it into the different colour layers that were to be printed.

At first I was going to do my screen print of my cute cartoon cat characters so then I could experiment with different colour combinations, but while I was sketching them out my little doggy Jeffrey kept looking at me as if to say “why are you doing cats when you could be doing a picture of me?” So I did a few sketches of him then painted my final master design and made the separate colour layers ready for Thursday morning.

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The first thing we did on the Thursday morning was prepare our screens by applying a light-sensitive emulsion to the surface then leaving it to dry. While it was drying we photocopied each separate layer of our design onto acetate, doubling each layer up to make them even more opaque to stop the light getting through.

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Once the emulsion was dry and the acetates ready we could then use the exposing machine to transfer the designs onto the screens. We did this by putting the acetate, with the design the correct way round, on the glass top of the machine. The screen was then placed emulsion side down on top of the acetate and the rubber lid lowered over them.

Next the vacuum was turned on so the rubber lid formed a tight seal over the screens, stopping any movement that could happen during exposure, then the shutters on the exposure unit were opened so the light could get to the coated screens. These were left open on a preset timer so that they were exposed to the light for the correct amount of time.

After the screens had been exposed we then needed to wash away the areas that had been shielded from the light by the design. This is how the photo process works, the light- sensitive emulsion gets baked onto the screen when it’s exposed to the light. Any areas that weren’t exposed to the light due to the design blocking it out doesn’t get baked. These areas can then be washed off to let the ink through when printing. That’s why it works better to do your design in black to make it as opaque as possible to stop the light getting through.

While the screens were drying, after having the unbaked emulsion washed off, the next job was to mix the inks ready for printing with. I needed a background colour, obviously I went for purple which I made light to contrast with the darkness of the black and grey, then I needed a black and a grey for the body. In my original design I had a black body with grey highlights for the ears and nose. Sadly I had to change this slightly and swap them round as the grey wouldn’t have shown up printed on top of the black, but apart from the eyes I don’t think that it negatively affected it too much.

Once the screens were dry and the ink mixed then we were ready to start printing. As the layers needed to print on top of each other I started by printing my background. I was doing edition printing, this meant that I’d been printing the same thing over and over again so I’d have a set of prints that were all the same. The joy of hand printing means that each one would still be slightly different though.

After the background was printed they were left to dry and I cleaned the ink off the screen. I could then set up ready for the next layer of printing. This meant securing the screen in the hinges that held it in place on the printing board, then lining up the background image to the screen so that it would print in the right place. Using masking tape on the corners of the paper to help register the next one in the same place.

You may remember from the blog post that I wrote a few months ago about my older work, read it here, that when I was studying A level printmaking I always felt that my registration let me down. So it was nice when Laura told me that it’s those things that make hand printing different to being perfectly printed by a machine. The so called mistakes or errors make each one unique even when it’s part of an edition. This made me feel a lot better and more positive towards that older work.

For the last layer of printing I again had to line up the paper with the new screen, using masking tape to help register the rest to the same spot. Also using the acetate print outs to help with this step too. Then it was time to leave them to dry and wash up the screens etc.

I really enjoyed the workshop, it was nice to go back to screen printing after the 15 or so years since I did it at college.

Till next time

Take care

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

Making of Douglas and Oxo 3D acrylic painting doggy portraits by artist Purple Faye

A couple of years ago, when I was in the Artworld 2 Gallery in Wakefield, I got a commission to make 2 small 3D acrylic paintings of doggies called Douglas and Oxo. The lady who commissioned them chose the background colours she wanted plus as an extra request she wanted the names painted on the canvas too.

I took these pictures as I was making them to show the process of how they were progressing. I started by drawing each one on cardboard, working from the photos she had sent to my phone. I then cut out the cardboard and sculpted it into layers to make the drawings 3D. Next I put modroc on to add texture and provide a solid base so then I could paint them with acrylic paints.

When she came to collect them from me at the gallery she was delighted with them. If you would like me to make a 3D acrylic painting of your dog or anything else then email info@purplefaye.co.uk

Till next time,

Take care.

Purple Faye

purplefaye.co.uk

Making of the “Jez” and “Ginge” kitty cats 3D Acrylic Paintings by artist Purple Faye

Here’s how I made the “Jez” and “Ginge” kitty cats 3D Acrylic Paintings. They are what I made as part of my demonstration at Holmfirth Art Week this year (which you can read more about here.)

The inspiration for them was the cute cats in the app game Neko Atsume (Cat Collector). I really liked how their simple design still looked cute. It reminded me of some of my earlier work where I gave the cats and dogs big cartoon eyes and I decideed that it was something that I wanted to return to.

Originally I was going to do a few in different poses, I am still going to do some more, but for the purpose of the demonstration I felt that I could show the process more effectively by having them in the same pose but with more subtle differences in size, texture and colour.

Last year when I did the demonstration at Holmfirth Art Week I showed the first few stages up to putting the modroc on but I didn’t do any painting, so this year I wanted to prepare some that were already at the painting stage so I would be able to demonstrate that part too.

My plan was to have one at each stage so that when people visited at different times of the day they would still be able to see the full process.

I started by drawing the basic outline of a cute cat on cardboard and cut it out, I then used this as a template to make the rest by drawing round it onto more pices of cardboard.

When it came to cutting these new cats out I’d change the shape slightly so each one would be slightly different then made them 3D in the same way by using more cardboard.

When I put the modroc on I gave each one a different texture using techniques such as scrunching, scoring and smoothing so that I could show what the modroc could do. I then left these to dry and sanded them before taking them to the demonstration.

If you would like to make one for yourself you can do so in a workshop with me at my studio in Pontefract, WF8 1PE (above Wetherspoons)

Contact info@purplefaye.co.uk

You can buy a kit from me directly, The Picture Box Gallery in Wakefield or from my shops on etsy and folksy.

etsy.com/uk/shop/PurpleFayeShop

folksy.com/shops/PurpleFaye

You can see videos of this on my youtube channel too youtube.com/purplefayecouk

I’m hoping to make some more 3D Acrylic Paintings of cute kitty cats with love heart noses soon.

What cat poses and colours should I do? Would you like to see more dogs and other animals done like this too?

Let me know in the comments below.

Thanks

Take care,

Till next time.

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

How I made the Pontefract “Buttercross and St Giles Church” 3D Acrylic Painting

Here’s how I made the Pontefract “Buttercross and St Giles Church” 3D Acrylic Painting

Here’s a video of it, on my youtube channel: youtube.com/purplefayecouk

About the Pontefract Buttercross and St Giles Church 

The focal point of Pontefract town centre, in the market place, is the Buttercross, which was built in 1734.

As the inscription on the south side states, the Buttercross was “Erected by Mrs Elizabeth Dupier, relict of Solomon Dupier, gentleman, in a cheerful and generous compliance with his benevolent intention, 1734”

When first constructed, the Buttercross had a flat roof surrounded by a balustrade but this was replaced by the present hipped roof at a cost of £46-3-10d during August and September 1763. Such covered market crosses were common during the eighteenth century but the Buttercross is a much more substantial structure than most others and is unusual in its rectangular plan. It continued to fulfil its original function as a market shelter for farmers wives with their baskets of dairy produce well into the 20th century but other more extraordinary transactions have taken place at the Buttercross during its existence such as wife selling.

Behind the Buttercross is situated St. Giles Church, which was built in the first few years of the 12′h century as a chapel-of-ease to All Saints’ Church, but due to the ruin of All Saints, Saint Giles became the Parish Church in 1789.

The Grade II listed building with its unique octagonal tower visible for miles around, proclaims the Glory of God to the people of Pontefract and its many visitors.

There has been some sort of religious building on the site since at least the 12th Century, although today’s building is generally associated with Georgian architecture.

(Find out more at pontefractus.co.uk)

 

If you have any questions or would like to comment then please do so below or email me at info@purplefaye.co.uk

 

Till next time,

Take care

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

 

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How I made The Flying Scotsman 3D Acrylic Painting

How I made The Flying Scotsman 3D Acrylic Painting.

(See the video on youtube.com/purplefayecouk)

If you have any questions or comments then please feel free to leave them below or email me at info@purplefaye.co.uk

About The Flying Scotsman No. 4472 (taken from wikipedia.org)

LNER Class A3 4472 Flying Scotsman is a Pacific steam locomotive built in 1923 for the London and North Eastern Railway (LNER) at Doncaster Works to a design of Nigel Gresley. It was employed on long-distance express East Coast Main Line trains by the LNER and its successors, British Railways Eastern and North-Eastern Regions, notably on the London to Edinburgh Flying Scotsman train service after which it was named.

The locomotive set two world records for steam traction, becoming the first steam locomotive to be officially authenticated at reaching 100 miles per hour (160.9 km/h) on 30 November 1934, and then setting a record for the longest non-stop run by a steam locomotive when it ran 422 miles (679 km) on 8 August 1989 while in Australia.

Retired from regular service in 1963 after covering 2.08 million miles, Flying Scotsman gained considerable fame in preservation under the ownership of, successively, Alan Pegler, William McAlpine, Tony Marchington, and finally the National Railway Museum (NRM). As well as hauling enthusiast specials in the United Kingdom, the locomotive toured extensively in the United States and Canada from 1969 until 1973 and Australia in 1988/89. Flying Scotsman has been described as the world’s most famous steam locomotive.

History

The locomotive was completed in 1923, construction having been started under the auspices of the Great Northern Railway (GNR). It was built as an A1, initially carrying the GNR number 1472, because the LNER had not yet decided on a system-wide numbering scheme.

Flying Scotsman was something of a flagship locomotive for the LNER. It represented the company at the British Empire Exhibition at Wembley in 1924 and 1925. Before this event, in February 1924 it acquired its name and the new number of 4472. From then on it was commonly used for promotional purposes.

With suitably modified valve gear, this locomotive was one of five Gresley Pacifics selected to haul the prestigious non-stop Flying Scotsman train service from London to Edinburgh, hauling the inaugural train on 1 May 1928. For this the locomotives ran with a new version of the large eight-wheel tender which held nine long tons of coal. This and the usual facility for water replenishment from the water trough system enabled them to travel the 392 miles (631 km) from London to Edinburgh in eight hours non-stop.

The tender included a corridor connection and tunnel through the water tank giving access to the locomotive cab from the train so that the driver and fireman could be changed without stopping the train. The following year the locomotive appeared in the film The Flying Scotsman.

While the Great Western Railway locomotive City of Truro had previously been unofficially timed at running in excess of 100 mph (160.9 km/h), 4472 became the first steam locomotive to be officially authenticated at this speed on 30 November 1934, driven by Bill Sparshatt and running a light test train. It earned a place in the land speed record for railed vehicles; the publicity-conscious LNER made much of the fact.

The locomotive ran with its corridor tender between April 1928 and October 1936, after which it reverted to the original type; in July 1938 it was paired with a streamlined non-corridor tender, and ran with this type until withdrawal. On 22 August 1928 an improved version of this Pacific type, classified A3, appeared; older A1 locomotives were later rebuilt to conform. On 25 April 1945, A1-class locomotives not yet rebuilt were reclassified A10 to make way for newer Thompson and Peppercorn Pacifics. Flying Scotsman emerged from Doncaster Works on 4 January 1947 as an A3, having received a boiler with the long “banjo” dome of the type it carries today. By this time it had been renumbered twice: under Edward Thompson’s comprehensive renumbering scheme for the LNER, it became No. 502 in January 1946; in May the same year, under an amendment to that plan, it become No. 103. Following nationalisation of the railways on 1 January 1948, almost all of the LNER locomotive numbers were increased by 60000; No. 103 became 60103 in December 1948.

Between 5 June 1950 and 4 July 1954, and between 26 December 1954 and 1 September 1957, under British Railways ownership, it was allocated to Leicester Central shed on the Great Central Railway, running Nottingham Victoria to London Marylebone services via Leicester Central.

All A3 Pacifics were subsequently fitted with a double Kylchap chimney to improve performance and economy. This caused soft exhaust and smoke drift that tended to obscure the driver’s forward vision; the remedy was found in the German-type smoke deflectors fitted from 1960, which somewhat changed the locomotives’ appearance.[15]

Preservation

In 1962, British Railways announced that it would scrap Flying Scotsman. Number 60103 ended service with its last scheduled run on 14 January 1963. Proposed to be saved by a group called “Save Our Scotsman”, they were unable to raise the required £3,000, the scrap value of the locomotive.

With the locomotive effectively placed up for sale, after a national campaign it was bought in April 2004 by the National Railway Museum in York, and it is now part of the museum’s National Collection. After 12 months of interim running repairs, it ran for a while to raise funds for its 10-year restoration.

Overhaul 2006–2016

In January 2006, Flying Scotsman entered the National Railway Museum’s workshops for a major overhaul to return it to Gresley’s original specification and to renew its boiler certificate; originally planned to be completed by mid-2010 if sufficient funds were raised, but late discovery of additional problems meant it would not be completed on time.  In October 2012, the museum published a report examining the reasons for the delay and additional cost. The locomotive was moved in October 2013 to Bury for work to return it to running condition in 2015. On 29 April 2015, Flying Scotsman‘s boiler left the National Railway Museum to be reunited with the rest of the locomotive at Riley & Sons in Bury.[42]

The bay in which the locomotive was being refurbished was on view to visitors to the NRM but the engine was rapidly dismantled to such an extent that the running plate was the only component recognisable to the casual observer. Early in 2009 it emerged that the overhaul would see the loco reunited with the last remaining genuine A3 boiler (acquired at the same time as the locomotive as a spare). The A4 boiler that the loco had used since the early 1980s was sold to Jeremy Hosking for potential use on his locomotive, LNER Class A4 4464 Bittern.

Return to service

The overhaul was completed in January 2016 and testing began on the East Lancashire Railway on 8 January 2016. Flying Scotsman was originally going to haul its inaugural mainline train called the Winter Cumbrian Mountain Express from Manchester Victoria to Carlisle on 23 January, but it was not ready due to faulty brakes. The first mainline run, pulling the Winter Cumbrian Mountain Express from Carnforth to Carlisle, took place on 6 February. An inaugural journey from London King’s Cross to York in traditional green livery ran on 25 February. Flying Scotsman will be making special tours throughout the UK in 2016.

 

If you have any questions or comments then please feel free to leave them below or email me at info@purplefaye.co.uk

Till next time

Take care

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk