How to Make Your Own Christmas Decorations mini 3D Pictures like artist Purple Faye’s Original 3D Acrylic Paintings

In this blog post I’m going to show you how to make your own Christmas decorations mini 3D pictures like artist Purple Faye’s (me) original 3D acrylic paintings, using the ‘Make Your Own Christmas Decorations 3D Picture Kits’ by Yorkshire artist Purple Faye.

First, you need to buy the kit/s here

Your kit/s contains step-by-step instructions to talk you through the cardboard and modroc stages of making your Christmas decorations mini 3D pictures. However, as the kits don’t contain paints I don’t go into any detail as to how you might like to paint them.

You can enjoy making it up for yourself but just in case you’d like some guidance here’s how I made the original 3D acrylic paintings that the kits are based on.

I start by drawing the design directly onto a piece of cardboard, you have the design already drawn for you by me in the form of the template, so all you need to do is cut it out and use that, following my instructions.

Next I cut out the design that I’ve drawn on the cardboard, as these are so small I keep it simple and use the one piece of cardboard, so once the design is cut out of the cardboard I can stick it straight onto the blank canvas and leave it to set.

The next stage is applying the modroc (bandages with plaster of Paris in them) over the cardboard on the canvas.

I did this by getting my piece of modroc and cutting it to the rough shape of what I needed, keeping in mind that it shrinks when wet so it’d need to be a bit bigger plus have some overlap to go round the edges too. I cut it when it’s dry as it’s easier to cut when it’s dry rather than wet. Plus once it gets wet that’s it you have to use it, so if you don’t need to use it all then you can’t save any offcuts for later.

I wet the modroc by filling a container (an old Tupperware dish) with cold water (using cold water slows down the setting time so you have longer to use it, warm water speeds it up) and a squirt of PVA/craft glue then dunking each piece of cut out modroc separately to try and reduce the amount of scrunching up in the water.

When removing the modroc from the water I try to wring out as much water as I can without distorting the shape too much. I then place it on top of the cardboard and start to smooth it out so it covers all the area that I need it to. I continue to do this until the whole cardboard shape is completely covered then I leave it to dry.

When the modroc is setting and still wet it looks a lightish grey colour and gets more white the drier it gets. I try to leave mine overnight at least to make sure it’s fully dry, it dries faster the warmer it is so if you wanted to speed up the process you can use a hairdryer on it.

Once it’s dry I give mine a quick sand with some fine sandpaper, just to get rid of any rough bits, then I start to paint it with acrylic paints. You can use whatever paints you have available though. For this one I used gold, red, yellow, white, green, black, orange brown and metallic purple.

Red, white, orange, black and metallic purple for the snowman and candy cane.

Gold, yellow, white, green, brown, red and metallic purple for the Christmas tree and star.

I started with the snowman and candy cane by painting them white, once as the base coat to seal the modroc and then another top coat to make sure it was fully covered. Next I used the black to paint in the snowman’s eyes, mouth and buttons, a bit of orange for his nose and red for his scarf. I used the red to paint in the stripes on the candy cane and finished them both with the metallic purple for the background.

I started with the Christmas tree and star by painting the tree green and the star yellow. I then painted gold over the yellow and used a bit of white to add some lighter highlights to the edges. Next I used the brown on the tree trunk and red to add some baubles, gold was used for the top of the tree and to add tinsel. I finished them both by using the metallic purple for the background.

So now you know how to make your own Christmas decorations mini 3D pictures like artist Purple Faye’s (me) original 3D acrylic paintings, using the ‘Make Your Own Christmas Decorations 3D Picture Kits’ by Yorkshire artist Purple Faye.

Enjoy making your kit and if you do get stuck contact me for help.

Find me on social media:

Facebook: facebook.com/purplefaye.co.uk

Instagram: instagram.com/purplefaye_art

Purple Faye x

How to Make Your Own Pumpkin 3D Picture like artist Purple Faye’s Original 3D Acrylic Painting

In this blog post I’m going to show you how to make your own pumpkin 3D picture like artist Purple Faye’s (me) original 3D acrylic painting, using the ‘Make Your Own Pumpkin 3D Picture Kit’ by Yorkshire artist Purple Faye.

First, you need to buy the kit here

Your kit contains step-by-step instructions to talk you through the cardboard and modroc stages of making your pumpkin 3D picture. However, as the kits don’t contain paints I don’t go into any detail as to how you might like to paint it. You can enjoy making it up for yourself but just in case you’d like some guidance here’s how I made the original 3D acrylic painting that the kits are based on. I made this one back in October 2012 when I just moved into my pop up shop in Castleford as a way to celebrate moving in and to decorate my shop for Halloween. Every October since then I put it on display in my studio as a nice reminder of this time. That’s why I finally decided this year to make a kit so you can make your own. So every year you can get it back out and remember when you made it, which is something you can’t do with a real pumpkin that will rot away once you’ve carved it.

I started by drawing the pumpkin design directly onto the piece of cardboard, you don’t have to worry about doing this as you already have the design drawn for you by me in the form of the template. All you need to do is cut it out and use that, following my instructions of which bits to cut out and where to put them.

Next I cut out the design. Building up the cardboard layers to make it 3D then sticking them onto the blank canvas.

It is this cardboard stage that makes them really 3D but because it is cardboard it isn’t as heavy as people think it will be when they think it’s solid plaster being used. So you don’t need to worry about it making your wall fall down when you hang your masterpiece on it.

The next stage is applying the modroc (bandages with plaster of Paris in them) over the cardboard layers.

I did this by getting my piece of modroc and cutting it to the rough shape of what I needed, keeping in mind that it shrinks when wet so it’d need to be a bit bigger plus have some overlap to go round the edges too. I cut it when it’s dry as it’s easier to cut when it’s dry rather than wet. Plus once it gets wet that’s it you have to use it, so if you don’t need to use it all then you can’t save any offcuts for later.

I wet the modroc by filling a container (an old Tupperware dish) with cold water (using cold water slows down the setting time so you have longer to use it, warm water speeds it up) and a squirt of PVA/craft glue then dunking each piece of cut out modroc separately to try and reduce the amount of scrunching up in the water.

When removing the modroc from the water I try to wring out as much water as I can without distorting the shape too much. I then place it on top of the cardboard and start to smooth it out so it covers all the area that I need it to. I continue to do this until the whole cardboard shape is completely covered, then I leave it to dry.

When the modroc is setting and still wet it looks a lightish grey colour and gets more white the drier it gets. I try to leave mine overnight at least to make sure it’s fully dry, it dries faster the warmer it is so if you wanted to speed up the process you can use a hairdryer on it.

Once it’s dry I give mine a quick sand with some fine sandpaper, just to get rid of any rough bits, then I start to paint it with acrylic paints. You can use whatever paints you have available though. For this one I used orange, yellow, green, navy blue and black.

I started by painting the whole of the pumpkin orange, once as the base coat to seal the modroc and then another top coat to make sure it was fully covered. Next I painted the stalk green and the eyes, nose and mouth holes black. Once the orange and green had dried I used the yellow to add highlights and finally mixed a navy blue with blue and black to paint the background so it looked like a dark sky but not quite as dark as black which I didn’t think worked as well. Using black for the background made the eyes, nose and mouth look like they were part of the background instead of being the inside of the pumpkin.

So now you know how to make your own pumpkin 3D picture like artist Purple Faye’s (me) original 3D acrylic painting, using the ‘Make Your Own Highland Cow 3D Picture Kit’ by Yorkshire artist Purple Faye.

Enjoy making your kit and if you do get stuck contact me for help.

Find me on social media:

Facebook: facebook.com/purplefaye.co.uk

Instagram: instagram.com/purplefaye_art

Purple Faye x

How to Make Your Own Highland Cow 3D Picture like artist Purple Faye’s Original 3D Acrylic Painting

In this blog post I’m going to show you how to make your own highland cow 3D picture like artist Purple Faye’s (me) original 3D acrylic painting, using the ‘Make Your Own Highland Cow 3D Picture Kit’ by Yorkshire artist Purple Faye.

First, you need to buy the kit here

Your kit contains step-by-step instructions to talk you through the cardboard and modroc stages of making your highland cow 3D picture. However, as the kits don’t contain paints I don’t go into any detail as to how you might like to paint it. You can enjoy making it up for yourself but just in case you’d like some guidance here’s how I made the original 3D acrylic painting that the kits are based on. In this case I’m showing you a few versions as it’s one of my oldest designs, and best sellers. It’s also one of my favourites that I like to show at artist demonstrations and workshops as I think it shows the technique off nicely, especially how I use modroc to create texture.

I start by drawing the highland cow design directly onto the piece of cardboard, you have the design already drawn for you by me in the form of the template, so all you need to do is cut it out and use that, following my instructions. In early versions, which you can see here, I include the eyes up until the modroc stage as I felt that it was important that even though you couldn’t see them behind the hair/fur that they still were there. But over the course of making various versions of them I came to realise that actually they aren’t neccesary, so that’s why they aren’t included in your template.

Next I cut out the design. In some versions, and in your instructions I get you to use more cardboard shapes to create the 3D layers, but with this one I just used the one piece of cardboard and created the 3D layers by overlapping the edges (apart from the eyes).

It is this cardboard stage that makes them really 3D but because it is cardboard it isn’t as heavy as people think it will be when they think it’s solid plaster being used.

The next stage is applying the modroc (bandages with plaster of Paris in them) over the cardboard layers.

I did this by getting my piece of modroc and cutting it to the rough shape of what I needed, keeping in mind that it shrinks when wet so it’d need to be a bit bigger plus have some overlap to go round the edges too. I cut it when it’s dry as it’s easier to cut when it’s dry rather than wet. Plus once it gets wet that’s it you have to use it, so if you don’t need to use it all then you can’t save any offcuts for later.

I wet the modroc by filling a container (an old Tupperware dish) with cold water (using cold water slows down the setting time so you have longer to use it, warm water speeds it up) and a squirt of PVA/craft glue then dunking each piece of cut out modroc separately to try and reduce the amount of scrunching up in the water.

When removing the modroc from the water I try to wring out as much water as I can without distorting the shape too much. I then place it on top of the cardboard and start to smooth it out so it covers all the area that I need it to. I continue to do this until the whole cardboard shape is completely covered. To create the highland cow’s hair/fur there are a few techniques to try, the main ones that I’ve found to be effective are scrunching and rolling. Both ways mean using more modroc once the whole shape is covered smooth so keep this in mind when you’re cutting your large piece of modroc down to size. Keep the offcuts to use to create your hair/fur texture. Scrunching means you use different sized pieces and once they’re wet you scrunch them on top of the smoothed modroc you previously applied. This creates a wrinkled effect. The next technique I’ve called rolling as it involves cutting thin strips of modroc and rolling them into sausage shapes before placing them on top of the previously applied modroc. You can also use your thumb/finger nail to gently score grooves/lines into the drying modroc too. Once you’re happy with the texture you’ve created it’s then time to leave it to dry.

When the modroc is setting and still wet it looks a lightish grey colour and gets more white the drier it gets. I try to leave mine overnight at least to make sure it’s fully dry, it dries faster the warmer it is so if you wanted to speed up the process you can use a hairdryer on it.

Once it’s dry I give mine a quick sand with some fine sandpaper, just to get rid of any rough bits, then I start to paint it with acrylic paints. You can use whatever paints you have available though. For this one I used brown, orange, yellow, white, green, and black.

I started by painting the whole of the highland cow white, once as the base coat to seal the modroc and then another top coat to make sure it was fully covered. Next I painted the body brown and the feet, horns and nose a light brown, by mixing the white and brown together. I painted in the nostrils with black and added some white highlights to the feet, nose and horns. I then used the orange, yellow, brown and white to mix in different ways on the hair/fur until I was happy with how it looked. Finally, I mixed a light green, as a suggestion of grass, to paint the canvas background with.

So now you know how to make your own highland cow 3D picture like artist Purple Faye’s (me) original 3D acrylic painting, using the ‘Make Your Own Highland Cow 3D Picture Kit’ by Yorkshire artist Purple Faye.

Enjoy making your kit and if you do get stuck contact me for help.

Find me on social media:

Facebook: facebook.com/purplefaye.co.uk

Instagram: instagram.com/purplefaye_art

Purple Faye x

How to Make Your Own Unicorn 3D Picture like artist Purple Faye’s Original 3D Acrylic Painting (rectangle version)

In this blog post I’m going to show you how to make your own unicorn 3D picture like artist Purple Faye’s (me) original 3D acrylic painting, the rectangle version, using the ‘Make Your Own Unicorn 3D Picture Kit’ by Yorkshire artist Purple Faye

First, you need to buy the kit here

Your kit contains step-by-step instructions to talk you through the cardboard and modroc stages of making your Unicorn 3D picture. However, as the kits don’t contain paints I don’t go into any detail as to how you might like to paint it. You can enjoy making it up for yourself but just in case you’d like some guidance here’s how I made the original 3D acrylic painting that the kits are based on.

Using the template I created I started by cutting it out and drawing round it onto the cardboard. I then cut the head/mane off of the template and used this to cut out another cardboard shape. To finish the cardboard stage I cut out the eye and placed all the cardboard cut out shapes onto the blank canvas, stuck them down with PVA/craft glue and left them to dry. It is this stage that makes them really 3D but because it’s cardboard it isn’t as heavy as people think it will be when they think it’s solid plaster being used.

The next stage was to apply the modroc (bandages with plaster of Paris in them) over the cardboard layers. I did this by getting my piece of modroc and cutting it to the rough shape of what I needed, keeping in mind that it shrinks when wet so it’d need to be a bit bigger plus have some overlap to go round the edges too. I cut it when it’s dry as it’s easier to cut when it’s dry rather than wet. Plus once it gets wet that’s it you have to use it, so if you don’t need to use it all then you can’t save any offcuts for later.

I wet the modroc by filling a container (an old Tupperware dish) with cold water (using cold water slows down the setting time so you have longer to use it, warm water speeds it up) and a squirt of PVA/craft glue then dunking each piece of cut out modroc separately to try and reduce the amount of scrunching up in the water. When removing the modroc from the water I try to wring out as much water as I can without distorting the shape too much. I then place it on top of the cardboard and start to smooth it out so it covers all the area that I need it to.

Once it’s all covered, including the sides where it meets the canvas, I then use extra bits on top of the hair/mane and tail to give it more texture. I did this by scrunching/ruffling it up and using my thumbnail, once it started to set, to gently score some lines into it too. You could also try cutting strips, wetting them and rolling them into sausages then placing them on top. To give a kind of dreadlocks appearance.

When the modroc is setting and still wet it looks a lightish grey colour and gets more white the drier it gets. I try to leave mine overnight at least to make sure it’s fully dry, it dries faster the warmer it is so if you wanted to speed up the process you can use a hairdryer on it.

Once it’s dry I give mine a quick sand with some fine sandpaper, just to get rid of any rough bits, then I start to paint it with acrylic paints. You can use whatever paints you have available though. For this one I only used white, shiny purple, gold, blue and black.

I started by painting the whole of the unicorn white, once as the base coat to seal the modroc and then another top coat to make sure it was fully covered. Next I painted the horn gold and the hair/mane and tail in the shiny purple, I mixed a light grey with the black and white to add some shading details to the legs, head and horn. I used the black to add the details on the face (eyes, nose and mouth) then I finished it off by mixing a light blue and painting the canvas background with it.

So now you know how to make your own unicorn 3D picture like artist Purple Faye’s (me) original 3D acrylic painting, the rectangle version, using the ‘Make Your Own Unicorn 3D Picture Kit’ by Yorkshire artist Purple Faye

Enjoy making your kit and if you do get stuck contact me for help.

Find me on social media:

Facebook: facebook.com/purplefaye.co.uk

Instagram: instagram.com/purplefaye_art

Purple Faye x

How Yorkshire Artist Purple Faye made the commissioned 3D Acrylic Painting of the American Office Building

In this blog post I’m going to show you how I made this commissioned 3D acrylic painting. The commission was to make a 3D acrylic painting version of a watercolour of the office building featured in the American version of The Office TV show. The significance of this watercolour is that it’s painted by one of the characters, Pam Beesly, in the show.

When I was first contacted about this commission I had to get my head around the fact that I’d firstly be doing a building, which are tricky because of the precision involved with the straight lines and propotions, secondly it’s a copy of someone elses work in a different medium so thirdly I’d have to tranlate the traits of the water colour painting into my own 3D acrylic painting style.

I enjoy a challenge though so was more than happy to take it on. Here’s how I did it:

Working from the picture that the customer sent me I started by drawing out the basic outline onto the cardboard, then cut it out and layered it up so some parts stuck out more than others.

 

Next I laid the dried modroc (bandages with plaster of Paris in, like they use when you break your arm or leg) over the cardboard and cut it to size before dunking it in some water than smoothing it over the cardboard.

 

Once the modroc was dry I sanded it down to get rid of any rough bits then painted a white base coat with acrylic paint. I then drew on top of the base coat with pencil to make it easier to know where to paint the details in.

I started with the trees/hedges as they took up quite a large area felt like an easy way to ease myself into it before tackling the trickier building with all it’s straight lines, that’s also why I did the cars first too.

I decided to paint the black lines in first then use the lighter colours of the building stonework and windows to neated them up and narrow them down. I did this so the pencil lines didn’t get lost by painting over them with the lighter colours first. It meant that I could try and keep them as straight as I could by reducing them to the right size rather than trying to add them afterwards.

Once the building had been completed I moved onto the sky and the foreground carpark.

After a few final details it was finished.

 

IMG_4818

I’m pleased to say that the customer was happy with it, they even said ” So much better than I expected it to be. I love it.” which is so lovely to hear.

If you’d like me to make you your own 3D acrylic painting, as you can see it can be of anything that is significant to you, then get it touch.

purplefaye.co.uk/contact

To see my current commission price list and more of my previous commissions go to:

purplefaye.co.uk/commissions

You can find me on social media if you fancy a chat there

facebook.com/purplefaye.co.uk

Instagram: @purplefaye_art

Would you like to sign up to my newsletter and become a VIP?

Sign up here

 

Till next time,

Take care.

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

How artist Purple Faye made the original ‘Charmander’, ‘Bulbasaur’ and ‘Squirtle’ Pokemon inspired 3D acrylic paintings

Continuing on from when I made the original ‘Pikachu’ and ‘Eevee’ Pokemon inspired 3D acrylic paintings, here, I decided to make some more and it made sense to me that the next ones should be the starter Pokemon from the first generation. So here is how I made ‘Charmander’, Bulbasaur’ and ‘Squirtle’

If you’d like to make your own I have kits available for only £5 and £10 here

Charmander here, Bulbasaur here, Squirtle here.

Here’s how I made them:

I started by drawing the design directly onto the cardboard, I then cut the cardboard out and made it into 3D layers. Once these had been stuck onto the blank canvases I covered each one in modroc(bandages with plaster of Paris in them) and painted with acrylic paints when the modroc was dry.

Here’s a more in depth look at each one, which you can use to help you when you’re making your own with one of my kits. Charmander Kit, Bulbasaur Kit, Squirtle Kit.

Charmander Kit, Bulbasaur Kit, Squirtle Kit.

If you need any more help or have any questions get in touch

All of the originals are available for sale, ‘Charmander’ found his forever home at Christmas but ‘Bulbasaur’ and ‘Squirtle’ are still looking for theirs, only £50 each.

Plus I have cards available too for only £2

Shop Now

 

Till next time,

Take care.

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

How artist Purple Faye made the ‘Baby George’ 3D acrylic painting commission

Last year I had the pleasure of making a 3D acrylic painting of 3 month old baby George.

George’s father, Alex, contacted me to make it for his wife, Mellissa, for her 30th birthday. Because Mellissa is blind Alex wanted me to make him one of my 3D acrylic paintings because it would be tactile for her to touch and experience rather than a flat photograph.

He sent me a selection of photographs before deciding, after some discussions with me on which would make a good 3D acrylic painting, on the one that he’d like me to work from.

The one he chose actually ended up being a digital photo taken of a physical photo in a frame, which could have been problematic in terms of reflections and colour distortions but thankfully it wasn’t too bad.

So here is how I made it starting by drawing it directly onto the cardboard so I could cut it out and make it 3D by layering the cardboard up. Once the cardboard layers were stuck on the blank canvas I could then apply the modroc (bandages with plaster of Paris in) and leave it to dry. I then painted it with acrylic paints.

If you would like me to make you a 3D acrylic painting the same size as ‘Baby George’ (12x16inches approx 305x406mm) for only £100 get in touch as this offer is available for a limited time only.

Any questions please ask.

You can be a Purple Faye VIP by joining up here

Till next time.

Take care.

Purple Faye x

PurpleFaye.co.uk

How artist Purple Faye made Alex’s ‘Targaryen Sigil’ (from Game of Thrones) 3D acrylic painting

Alex asked me if I’d be able to make him a 3D acrylic painting of the Targaryen Sigil from Game of Thrones. I said that it would be fiddly but yeah I’d be able to make it for him. This shows how I did it (it was as fiddle as I was expecting it to be but I enjoyed the challenge)

If you’d like me to make you a 3D acrylic painting then get in touch.

With this one being so fiddly I jumped straight in with cutting the design out of cardboard using a craft knife, rather than by drawing it all out first like I usually do, this was mainly to speed up the process.

You can see in the photos how I used a combination of print outs and having the image on a tablet to work from to make sure that I got everything in the right place.

I used one layer of thick cardboard to make the image stick out but not too much, giving it a more subtle embossed look.

Once the cardboard was all cut out and positioned on the canvas I then stuck it down and began the equally fiddly job of putting the modroc (bandages with plaster of Paris in) on top.

Once everything was covered and all the gaps were filled I let the modroc dry before I could then begin painting it with acrylic paints.

The first coat of paint was the easiest stage of the whole process as it was just a black base coat all over, in all the nooks and crannies.

Then once that had dried I could start painting in the red dragon and all the extra black and white details before finishing it off by painting in the white writing.

As I said at the start I knew this was going to be a challenging commission because it was so fiddly, so when I finished it I was pleased with the outcome and was even more pleased that Alex was so complimentary about it once he had seen it too.

If you’d like me to make you a 3D acrylic painting then get in touch.

Take care.

Till next time.

purplefaye.co.uk

How artist Purple Faye made the original ‘Eevee’ and ‘Pikachu’ Pokemon inspired 3D acrylic paintings

I’ve been a fan of Pokemon for a long time and I’ve been playing Pokemon Go since it came out in 2016.

I’ve been thinking about maing some fan art of it for a while but I’ve only just started making some now. I’ve started with Pikachu and Eeeve because they are the first starters in the switch game Pokemon Let’s Go (plus I’ve always liked those two characters too).

Here’s how I made them both into 3D acrylic paintings starting with the drawing on cardboard, cutting the cardboard out into layers which I then stuck together and covered with modroc (plaster of Paris in bandages) and painted with acrylic paint once the modroc was dry.

This is the ‘Eevee’:

and this is the ‘Pikachu’:

Do you have a favourite Pokemon that you’d like to see me make into a 3D acrylic painting?

I’d love to know what your favourite (or favourites are if you can’t choose just one)

Let me know here.

or leave me a comment below.

Any questions then please ask using the link above too.

 

Till next time,

Take care.

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

How to make your own Love Hearts 3D picture like artist Purple Faye.

Earlier this year I took part in Holmfirth Artweek artist demonstrations, 7th-13th July 2019, this time I showed you how to make your very own Love Hearts 3D picture using one of my kits. This is one of my more simple but effective designs which would be ideal for an absolute beginner to make.

 

In the pictures below you can see how I used the template included in the kit to draw out the cardboard layers (the instructions included in the kit tell you which bits you need to cut out), these were then stuck together on the canvas and left to dry.

Next I cut the dry modroc (bandages with plaster of Paris in) to size before I dunked it in a water and PVA/craft glue solution, wrung out the water and spread it out on top of the cardboard love hearts.

This is the stage that the kit gets you too, you then need to leave it to dry. (Mine had from Friday afternoon until Saturday morning in warm temperatures, yours may need longer or you may need to use a hairdryer to help speed things up a bit.)

While you’re waiting for it to dry you can get your paints ready that you’re going to use. I use acrylic paints and all I needed for this was black, white and red (I mixed the pink colour myself using the red and white). I started by painting the large heart in red, I then mixed my pink and used that on the smaller heart once the red was dry. Once the pink was dry I used white to add the highlights in the corners (as shown on the template) and then finished it off with a black background.

etsy.com/uk/shop/purplefayeshop

If you have already bought one of my kits thank you, if you haven’t got one yet but would like to then they are available from my etsy shop here or you can contact me directly here.

If you require any more help/advice then please contact me.

 

Till next time.

Take care.

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk