How I made the Pontefract “Buttercross and St Giles Church” 3D Acrylic Painting

Here’s how I made the Pontefract “Buttercross and St Giles Church” 3D Acrylic Painting

Here’s a video of it, on my youtube channel: youtube.com/purplefayecouk

About the Pontefract Buttercross and St Giles Church 

The focal point of Pontefract town centre, in the market place, is the Buttercross, which was built in 1734.

As the inscription on the south side states, the Buttercross was “Erected by Mrs Elizabeth Dupier, relict of Solomon Dupier, gentleman, in a cheerful and generous compliance with his benevolent intention, 1734”

When first constructed, the Buttercross had a flat roof surrounded by a balustrade but this was replaced by the present hipped roof at a cost of £46-3-10d during August and September 1763. Such covered market crosses were common during the eighteenth century but the Buttercross is a much more substantial structure than most others and is unusual in its rectangular plan. It continued to fulfil its original function as a market shelter for farmers wives with their baskets of dairy produce well into the 20th century but other more extraordinary transactions have taken place at the Buttercross during its existence such as wife selling.

Behind the Buttercross is situated St. Giles Church, which was built in the first few years of the 12′h century as a chapel-of-ease to All Saints’ Church, but due to the ruin of All Saints, Saint Giles became the Parish Church in 1789.

The Grade II listed building with its unique octagonal tower visible for miles around, proclaims the Glory of God to the people of Pontefract and its many visitors.

There has been some sort of religious building on the site since at least the 12th Century, although today’s building is generally associated with Georgian architecture.

(Find out more at pontefractus.co.uk)

 

If you have any questions or would like to comment then please do so below or email me at info@purplefaye.co.uk

 

Till next time,

Take care

Purple Faye x

purplefaye.co.uk

 

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